• Short Summary

    A new soil stabilisation process tried out in the Libyan desert in an attempt to discover a method of defeating the desert's erosive, sand-laden winds is proving a success.

  • Description

    A new soil stabilisation process tried out in the Libyan desert in an attempt to discover a method of defeating the desert's erosive, sand-laden winds is proving a success.

    The process entails the use of a flexible synthetic rubber coating sprayed over the desert. The rubber binds the sand particles together, providing a firm base for the growth of vegetation and trees.

    This method has recently been developed by researchers in Britain. Working under contract from the Libyan government, a team carried out the process in April, and planted 60,000 Eucalyptus saplings aimed at providing a future barrier against the force of the erosive winds. This month, the team have reported that the scheme is proving a success. The saplings have taken firm root, and are maintaining a high rate of growth in the newly stabilised send.

    SYNOPSIS: For a long time, researchers have been trying to discover a method of stabilising the soil in areas badly affected by erosive winds. A new process applied in the Libyan desert is now proving a success.

    It is based on a new synthetic rubber produced in liquid form and sprayed over the soil. The rubber coating binds the soil particles together - in this case sand which is being constantly eroded and shifted by fierce desert winds. Tightened by the rubber coating, the soil becomes a firm base for planting. Vegetation and saplings can take root in an area hitherto badly affected by winds which had torn the soil cover from vegetation, exposed roots and destroyed young trees. In this Libyan project, 60,000 Eucalyptus saplings have been planted in the newly treated sand. Experts report they are growing well. In time, they will provide a massive natural barrier against the wind.

    This process has been discovered by an international firm of synthetic rubber producers based in Britain. Working under contract from the Libyan Government, they applied the process over 400 acres of desert at Zawia, near Tripoli. This project is just the first part of a vast programme of forestation planned by the Libyan Agriculture Ministry. In time, they aim to process 37,500 acres of windswept desert with this revolutionary method. Already, arid areas in South Africa and Australia have been treated. And regions constantly subjected to wind gusts approaching eighty miles an hour are successfully producing a protective layer of vegetation.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA7TJVGA8EJNSNTRH42CBTWTB98
    Media URN:
    VLVA7TJVGA8EJNSNTRH42CBTWTB98
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    23/06/1971
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:01:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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