• Short Summary

    Ship-wrecking for scrap iron in Taiwan has been growing as steadily as it has been declining in other parts of the world.

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  • Description

    Ship-wrecking for scrap iron in Taiwan has been growing as steadily as it has been declining in other parts of the world.

    ???ising costs in the United States, Italy, Spain and Hong Kong ???ve virtually Forced these centres out of the market. But in Taiwan last year, 875 ships totalling 1,407,964 tons were scra??? -- making it the world's largest centre for ship-wrecking.

    There ware currently 119 firms engaged in the industry, almost double the figure of 65 companies in 1972. Lost of these firms ro???steel companies, engaged in scrapping to meet the cemands of their own foundries. The most active ones use scrap iron from 15 ships a year.

    The majority of the ships dismantled at Taiwan's main centre of Maoshinug are from the United States. Most of them are carge vessals around 2C years old, but they also include naval vessels, tankers, container and passenger ships.

    SYNOPSIS: At Taiwan's southern port of Maohsiung, old cargo vessels, tankers, passenger ships and naval vessels -- mostly from the United States - are being demolished for scrap iron.

    Last year, 275 ships totalling nearly one and a half million tones were scrapped -- making Taiwan the world's largest centre for ship-wracking.

    Ship-wrecking for scrap iron in Taiwan has been growing as steadily as it has been declining in other parts of the world.

    Rising coast in the United States, Italy, Spair and Hong Kong have virtually forced these traditional ship-wrecking centres out of the market.

    There are currently 119 firms engaged in the industry, almost double the figure of 1972. Nest of these firms are steel companies, engaged in scrapping to meet the demands of their own foundries.

    The most active steel companies use scrap iron from 15 ships a year. Taiwan has no known iron are deposits and virtually all its scrap iron is derived from old ships.

    With world prices almost double in the last la months, demolishing old ships for scrap iron has become a profitable business.

    Many of the world's old ships will, as they do now, turn up Taiwan at the end of their last voyage.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA7S0II704BPG98MFBZGDJ567TY
    Media URN:
    VLVA7S0II704BPG98MFBZGDJ567TY
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    09/07/1974
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:36:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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