• Short Summary

    Bolivian President Hugo Banzer on Monday (8 July) swore in an all-military cabinet following the mass resignation a few hours earlier of his previous cabinet of civilian and military ministers.

  • Description

    Bolivian President Hugo Banzer on Monday (8 July) swore in an all-military cabinet following the mass resignation a few hours earlier of his previous cabinet of civilian and military ministers.

    The previous 17-man cabinet was whittled down to 14---and twelve of the new members were sworn in at the Presidential Palace in the capital, La Paz. The two remaining cabinet appointments were yet to be named - four of the five military officers in the previous government were retained.

    The change in the cabinet structure appeared to arise from pressure from the military forces. Early last month, an abortive coup by dissident military officers in the capital quickly collapsed. Its leaders had demanded general elections, the removal of President Banzer and the installation of a military government.

    After swearing-in the new military cabinet, President Banzer promised that next year "the country will be constitutionalised". This has been interpreted to mean general elections which have not been held in Bolivia since 1966.

    President Banzer -- who seized power after a brief civil war in 1971 overthrew military President Juan Jose Torres -- has previously had to withdraw the promise of elections under military pressure.

    In recent months, the military have spoken of "institutionalisation" of the country's political system--without spelling out exactly what that implied.

    SYNOPSIS: La Paz, the Bolivian capital, went through its latest political crisis this week. On Monday, the entire seventeen-man cabinet resigned and was replaced within hours by an all-military line-up. The previous cabinet --made up of civilian and military ministers--was whittled down to fourteen. President Hugo Banzer swore in twelve of them at the Presidential Palace including four of the five military officers retained from the previous government.

    President Banzer seized power in nineteen-seventy-one after a brief civil war in which President Juan Jose Torres was overthrown. In his address to the nation on Monday, President Banzer promised as he put it, to constitutionalise the country next year. This has been interpreted to mean general elections. But President Banzer has had to break previous promises of elections under pressure from the military.

    The military reportedly wants to institutionalise Bolivia's political system. But there seems to be no clear explanation of what they mean by this. The new cabinet is largely dominated by the Army. The Navy holds one post, and ??? Air Force has two.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA7LP1PMD9R0HN0N37BOMAMT83N
    Media URN:
    VLVA7LP1PMD9R0HN0N37BOMAMT83N
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    12/07/1974
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:15:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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