• Short Summary

    After 13 years of guerrilla warfare, the people of Africa's youngest nation - the Republic of Guinea-Bissau - are starting a new life of peace and independence.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Governor's Palace.
    0.06

    2.
    GV Street scene. (2 shots)
    0.32

    3.
    GV Harbour.
    0.37

    4.
    SV PAN Military vehicles on dockside.
    0.45

    5.
    SV PAN Artillery on dockside.
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    6.
    GV PAN Military ships on quayside.
    1.01

    7.
    GV Dockyard.
    1.07

    8.
    GV Border post.
    1.14

    9.
    GV Border guards.
    1.20

    10.
    GV Truck with people stops at border. (2 shots)
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    11.
    SV Check on documents.
    1.50



    Initials VS 21.39 VS 21.51



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: After 13 years of guerrilla warfare, the people of Africa's youngest nation - the Republic of Guinea-Bissau - are starting a new life of peace and independence.

    Until 10 September, it was officially a province of Portugal, although last year the PAIGC - the Party for the Independence of Guinea-Bissau and Cape Verde Islands - declared independence unilaterally.

    Seventy-five per-cent of the 20,000 Portuguese troops have already pulled out, and by the end of this month (October) they will all be gone.

    They leave behind a small, dilapidated capital of mud huts, a harbour with two jetties, oil storage tanks and a network of strategic tarmaced roads and airstrips and an inadequate educational and medical service.

    Guinea-Bissau, first discovered in 1446, was Portugal's oldest African colony. But until the beginning of this century, it was used only as a staging-post for Portuguese merchant ships heading for the more lucrative colonies of Brazil and the East.

    Its undeveloped economy suffered a further setback because of the exploitation by colonial traders and farmers.

    Until the last decade, the country had a relatively peaceful life. Then African nationalists began fighting a guerrilla war in the territory to win its independence.

    It was a war primarily to hurt the local population, said Brigadier Carlos Fabiao, the last Governor-General of the country, and now the first Portuguese delegate to the new Republic.

    Ironically, it was former Commander-in-Chief of Portuguese Forces in Guinea-Bissau, General Antonio de Spinola, who became Portugal's revolutionary President in April this year - following the overthrow of the dictatorial Caetano regime. Spinola had published theories that Portugal could never retain its African Empire by force.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA7LH5JK2NNQ2HBGKKUHQYPKDB3
    Media URN:
    VLVA7LH5JK2NNQ2HBGKKUHQYPKDB3
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    08/10/1974
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:51:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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