• Short Summary

    The United States Government has agreed to shut down its aid missions in provincial Laos as a first step to entirely abolishing the U.

  • Description

    1.
    MV Demonstrators with placards.
    0.08

    2.
    CU American looking through compound wire.
    0.11

    3.
    MV Demonstrators off bus and enter U.S. aid compound
    0.26

    4.
    CU U.S. Flag on light aircraft PULLOUT MV.
    0.32

    5.
    CU Helicopters.
    0.35

    6.
    CU Air Laos employees seated. (2 shots)
    0.38

    7.
    MV News conference. (4 shots)
    0.54

    8.
    MV Demonstrators outside U.S.A. compound signing petition. (2 shots)
    1.04

    9.
    MV Vientiane-side Lao soldier and crowd look on.
    1.05

    10.
    MV Three U.S. employees standing outside gate.
    1.09

    11.
    MV Demonstrator handing out pamphlets.
    1.15

    12.
    MV & CU Anti U.S. posters.
    1.20

    13.
    MV Demonstrators outside compound.
    1.25

    14.
    MCU Pathet Lao soldiers.
    1.30

    15.
    CU Demonstrators look on as U.S. car searched (2 shots)
    1.46



    Initials VS 22.35 VS 22.55



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: The United States Government has agreed to shut down its aid missions in provincial Laos as a first step to entirely abolishing the U.S. aid programme in the country.

    The announcement by a Laotian Government spokesman came as student demonstrators continued to occupy the U.S. aid mission in Vientiane. They have made a 12-point list of demands, including the expulsion of all American personnel from the country. They claim the aid missions are harbouring Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)
    The Government still wants American money -- which at 32 million dollars a year is the mainstay of the economy -- but in direct payments and says all U.S. equipment and buildings should be handed over to Laotians.

    At Savannakhet, in the south, student demonstrators are still holding six U.S. aid officials and their families and dependence under house arrest, despite pleas from a Government ministerial team to release them.

    About three miles outside Vientiane, where most of the U.S. aid families live, they are almost as confined. Troops of the Joint Protection Force set up under the 1973 ceasefire agreement have been checking cars entering and leaving the residential compound They also demanded to check personal luggage and when the Americas refused, sealed off the area. The Americans later agreed to the search.

    In a diplomatic protest to the Lao government, American Embassy officials accused the demonstrators of looting and said the Lao troops had done nothing to stop them.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA7L3OR5PPRVLTLVBII47QX2UDZ
    Media URN:
    VLVA7L3OR5PPRVLTLVBII47QX2UDZ
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    23/05/1975
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:46:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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