• Short Summary

    Polish party leader Stanislaw Kania has told the country that there are divisions within the ruling Communist Party and that the Polish crisis is not yet over.

  • Description

    1.
    GVs Polish members of Parliament seated in house in Warsaw. (2 SHOTS)
    0.13

    2.
    SV Party members listening. (3 SHOTS)
    0.24

    3.
    GV House in session.
    0.26

    4.
    GV Vice Marshal Andrezj Verbal speaking to the house. (2 SHOTS)
    0.35

    5.
    TV PAN Cars in Warsaw street PAN TO GV OF Warsaw.
    0.48

    6.
    GV Buses standing idle in Warsaw street. (2 SHOTS)
    1.01

    7.
    GV People standing at bus stop. PAN TO stationary buses in centre of road.
    1.12

    8.
    SV PULL BACK GV Stationary taxis with drivers nearby. (2 SHOTS)
    1.31

    9.
    SV People waiting for taxis.
    1.41

    10.
    SV Department store and people walking down street. (2 SHOTS)
    1.52

    11.
    SV Police officer directing traffic and trams moving down street. (2 SHOTS)
    2.06

    12.
    TV Queues near taxi rank.
    2.11




    Initials JS/



    TELERECORDING

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Polish party leader Stanislaw Kania has told the country that there are divisions within the ruling Communist Party and that the Polish crisis is not yet over. But he said the party would honour its commitments to labour leaders over the formation of free trade unions.

    SYNOPSIS: When Poland's parliament met on Wednesday (8 October) it immediately voted to bring back the Supreme Chamber of Control, a political accounts watchdog which will oversee all Government officials. The move followed a pledge by Mr. Kania to reform the party and purge corruption. He said the country's new free trade unions would have to fit in with the Socialist state. The party, he said, would do everything to maintain the political unity of the trade union movement so that although it was organisationally divided, it remained Socialist in character.

    Last Friday (3 October) thousands of members of the new trade union movement stopped work for an hour in a show of strength. Strike leader Lech Walesa a ordered the stoppage to protest at what he describes at the Government's failure to honour agreements on higher pay and giving his movement access to the media. Among the strikers were bus and taxi drivers who bought the capital to a standstill.

    The strike, the first nationally organised labour protest in thirty six years of Communist rule in Poland, went ahead despite threats by the Government that it would endanger newly-won union rights. Mr. Walesa did not appear to be concerned at the threat but in a conciliatory gesture he said the union's plan to stage a general strike on October the twentieth had been officially withdrawn.

    The stoppage was timed to coincide with the beginning of the Communist Party Central Committee meeting. There were many heated debates at the meeting as politicians sought a scapegoat for the country's crisis. Many criticised former party chief Edward Gierek's administration. Most speakers agreed that the pledges to the unions over pay and coverage in the media of their activities must be met. The meeting ended with the sacking of six committee members. The six, including former Prime Minister Edward Babiuch, had been fired from Government posts last August at the height of the labour unrest.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA7HJEM211G0OX3QQRS9IP8MQOY
    Media URN:
    VLVA7HJEM211G0OX3QQRS9IP8MQOY
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    08/10/1980
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:11:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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