• Short Summary

    It's reported that almost all of the people who were made homeless as a result of the India-Pakistan war will soon have some form of temporary shelter to enable them to survive the monsoon rains.

  • Description

    It's reported that almost all of the people who were made homeless as a result of the India-Pakistan war will soon have some form of temporary shelter to enable them to survive the monsoon rains. And in some of the refugee camps around Dacca, the first steps of a programme to provide building materials for huts and houses has already begun.

    One of the biggest problems in the building of new shelters is materials. It's reported that there's a shortage of timber products including bamboo. Bamboo cutting has so exceeded the natural growth, that it's said that the shortage may last for over a decade.

    The Untied Nations relief operation in Dacca estimated last February that 200,000 tons of corrugated iron sheets and 400,000 tons of timber were needed to restore the 1.6 million houses that were destroyed in the fighting. And that figure, it's reported, still stands today.

    But provisional shelters are being built. Some are constructed of P.V.C. sheeting supplied by the Red Cross. The Bangladesh Ecumenical Relief and Rehabilitation Service--established last year on the initiative of the World council of Churches--has launched a programme to provide 25,000 bamboo-and-thatch houses for refugees returning from India. They've also supplied thousands of water pumps to communities that don't already have a supply of water.

    SYNOPSIS: These refugees near Dacca represent one of Bangladesh's biggest problems--they're homeless. Their homes were among the one-point-six million houses wrecked in last year's fighting between India and Pakistan. But, it's reported that nearly all of the homeless war refugees in the country will soon have some sort of temporary shelter to enable them to survive the monsoon rains. One of the toughest problems facing any shelter programme, however, is the lack of building materials. There's already a serious bamboo shortage.

    A start has been made at this camp near the capital. An organisation called the Bangladesh Ecumenical Relief and Rehabilitation Service was established last year on the initiative of the World Council of Churches. They've launched a programme to provide twenty-five thousand simple bamboo-and-thatch houses for refugees returning from India. They've also supplied thousands of water pumps for communities that don't have water supplies.

    Provisional shelters are being built elsewhere around Dacca as well. In this camp huts are constructed form P.V.C. sheeting provided by the Red Cross. There's still a problem as far as permanent housing is concerned, though. The Red Cross relief operation has estimated that hundreds of thousands of tons of corrugated iron sheets and timber is needed for house re-building.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA7D2XO9BUIXNMOCF8A8EIQ241U
    Media URN:
    VLVA7D2XO9BUIXNMOCF8A8EIQ241U
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    07/06/1972
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:27:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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