• Short Summary

    The ousted Khmer Rouge government of Pol Pot on Sunday (31 August) denied a Soviet report that it was responsible while in power for killing 20-thousand members of a Kampuchean minority Moslem group.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Village of Trapian Sua in Kampuchea (3 SHOTS)
    0.34

    2.
    SV Former school bricked up. (3 SHOTS)
    0.54

    3.
    SCU ZOOM OUT TO SV OF Chains and building. (2 SHOTS)
    1.12

    4.
    GV Palm trees ZOOM OUT TO barred window.
    1.18

    5.
    SV Writing on wall.
    1.25

    6.
    SV PAN Bricked up buildings. (3 SHOTS)
    1.33

    7.
    GV PAN Skeletons and skulls in rows. (2 SHOTS)
    1.54

    8.
    GV Buildings and fields. (2 SHOTS)
    2.03

    9.
    GV PAN Workers in paid fields. (6 SHOTS)
    2.26

    10.
    SV Sign over supplies and supplies being carried. (8 SHOTS)
    3.00




    Initials JS/





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: The ousted Khmer Rouge government of Pol Pot on Sunday (31 August) denied a Soviet report that it was responsible while in power for killing 20-thousand members of a Kampuchean minority Moslem group. It claimed the Soviet news agency Tass had invented the story. Tass said Pol Pot's forces massacred members of the Cham minority group that left the Chams on the verge of extinction. The report said the bodies of 20-thousand Chams were found after they had been tied up and thrown down a gorge in central Kompong Cham province.

    SYNOPSIS: Whether the reports are true or not, evidence found elsewhere points to large-scale massacres. The settlement of Trapian Sua in Kandal Province is now dead.

    In Kampuchea such sights are not uncommon, dead villagers, ravaged cities, damaged houses, skeletons. But it is almost impossible to adjust to the scenes that unfold at Trapian Sua.

    This building used to be a school. The Soviet team that took this film said Pol Pot soldiers blocked the windows with bricks leaving only small apertures for air. The school became a prison for thousands of people. They were chained to metal bars and left to suffocate and die in the congestion of their quarters.

    But even those who managed to endure the ordeal in this prison did not survive. More than 18-thousand people , lost their lives in Trapian Sua. So far the names of only five thousand of those who died in the prison have been established. The rest of the victims are still anonymous. Millions of people are said to have been killed by the Pol Pot regime. In Trapian Sua, gengcide became a reality.

    Rows of skeletons and skulls attest to brutal murder, killing on a gigantic scale.

    But life goes on and in this are rice is the staple diet. Helped by international relief agencies, Kampuchea is said to be recovering from mass starvation and may achieve self-sufficiency in rice next year. The country's December harvest and the dry season harvest early next year should produce more than Kampuchea's needs. But the World Food Programme estimated there will be a 120-thousand ton food shortage in Kampuchea between now and the December harvest. There have been reports that rice sent to Kampuchea through its Vietnamese-backed government is being used to feed government officials and workers. Diplomatic sources said villagers appeared to be getting only about two killogrammes (four and a half pounds) of rice a month. But the government had denied this.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA79DPB7IRRSXOJIROBIXUW2MEH
    Media URN:
    VLVA79DPB7IRRSXOJIROBIXUW2MEH
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    06/09/1980
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:03:00:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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