• Short Summary

    In Ecuador's first general election in seven years, left-of-centre lawyer Jaime Roldos looked set to score a crushing victory over Conservative Sixty Duran.

  • Description

    1.
    GV: city of Quito
    0.06

    2.
    GV: traffic in Quito streets with mountains behind.
    0.13

    3.
    GV: people queuing outside polling booths with armed troops nearby. (2 shots)
    0.21

    4.
    CU: elections posters outside polling station.
    0.24

    5.
    SV: armed soldiers at entrance to polling station.
    0.30

    6.
    GV: voters lining up in football field and armed soldiers (3 shots)
    0.43

    7.
    SV: voters queuing
    0.48

    8.
    SV: voting officials recording woman's name from identity card and woman signing electoral roll.
    1.02

    9.
    SV: people placing votes in ballot boxes. (2 shots)
    1.12

    10.
    GV: people queuing at another polling station. (2 shots)
    1.23

    11.
    GV: large crowd waiting to vote ZOOM IN TO armed soldiers (4 shots)
    1.36

    12.
    GV: people in Quito streets. (2 shots)
    1.47



    Initials RH/



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: In Ecuador's first general election in seven years, left-of-centre lawyer Jaime Roldos looked set to score a crushing victory over Conservative Sixty Duran. Thirty-eight year old Roldos would be the youngest elected President of this oil-rich country, and the youngest ever in all Latin America.

    SYNOPSIS: The city of Quito, eight thousand feet (2,800 metres) up in the Andes mountains is the capital of the second largest oil exporter in Latin America. The country has been ruled for the past seven years by a military triumvirate led by Admiral Alfredo Poveda Burbano after it toppled the regime of five time President Juan Velasco Ibarra.

    The first round of voting took place last July, when Senor Roldos and the fifty-seven year old former mayor of Quito, Senor Duran, emerged as presidential candidates. Since then, progress toward this second round was repeatedly delayed by rumours of a coup d'etat, scandals and resignations in the electoral tribunal, and the assassination of the leader of a political party Abdon Calderon.

    Ecuador's population numbers six and a half million and it was compulsory for two million of them to vote for a president, vice president and 69 representatives.

    The voting trends appeared to observers to reflect a desire to improve the lives of the many rural dwellers who have remained poor despite seven years of big oil revenues. Mr. Roldos has campaigned on a pledge to introduce democracy and social justice. But the new president will take office in a country with a history of political instability. There have been 59 coups since Ecuador won independence from Spain 159 years ago.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA78REFM71P4RIBIXQEZE1QO0AG
    Media URN:
    VLVA78REFM71P4RIBIXQEZE1QO0AG
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    01/05/1979
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:48:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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