• Short Summary

    Pakistani Prime Minister Zulfikar Ali Bhutto concluded two days of talks with President Nixon on Wednesday (19 September), with assurances from the U.

  • Description

    Pakistani Prime Minister Zulfikar Ali Bhutto concluded two days of talks with President Nixon on Wednesday (19 September), with assurances from the U.S. President of continued economic and humanitarian aid, but with no prospect of renewed weapons shipments.

    Mr. Bhutto was formally greeted by President Nixon at the White House on Tuesday (18 September). Mr. Nixon told the Pakistani leader, "our hearts have gone out to you in the difficult time," in a reference to the 1971 conflict with India. "You deserve the congratulations of the whole world for the way you have guided your country in the days after the devastating war."
    Mr. Nixon reaffirmed, publicly, U.S. support for Pakistan. He said that "the independence and integrity of Pakistan is a cornerstone of U.S. policy."
    But while the Washington visit was a personal triumph for Mr. Bhutto, and won the strongest statement yet of American support for Pakistan, it did not fulfil all that Mr. Bhutto had hoped. The U.S. still refuses to ship any weapons to Pakistan, an arms embargo that was imposed in 1965, although economic and humanitarian aid will continue.

    Mr. Bhutto said after his talks, that his country did not want to engage in an arms race with India -- also under a U.S. weapons embargo -- although, he added, "peace cannot be sustained by illusions."

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA71EF897VUQQXQG6DBO6B0ZOHD
    Media URN:
    VLVA71EF897VUQQXQG6DBO6B0ZOHD
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    20/09/1973
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:00:47:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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