• Short Summary

    The Vietnamese-supported government of Heng Samrin began 1984 facing continuing problems of war and hunger.Internationally, the country remains relatively isolated.The 30 nations and organizations which diplomatically recognize the country are largely from the Soviet bloc.On January 4, President Samrin dedicated a new monument in Phnom Penh to the people as part of the celebrations to mark the fifth anniversary of victory over the former government of Pol Pot.In the capital, the central market was reopened, with stalls selling produce, as well as bicycles, meat and vegetables from state-backed enterprises.Since 1979, the country's basic infrastructure and industries have been partially revived, producing small exports of rubber, wood, and tobacco.However, roads and other communications were recently reported to be in poor condition and machine spare parts and electrical power remained intermittent.Output of rubber, rice and fish food is still well below 1970 levels.Adequate food supplies are a perennial problem.Associated Press reports said the country might have achieved self-sufficiency in rice last year but for a series of natural weather disasters.These setbacks prompted a senior United Nations official to say the prospects for food production over the next few months were very disturbing.Sir Robert Jackson, chief U.N.co-ordinator of Humanitarian Assistance to Kampuchea, said the erratic monsoon had compounded problems of the physical weakness of farmers after years of privation, the sharp drop in the numbers of livestock, lack of fertilizers and the internal security situation.Latest pledges of aid -- standing at less than 10 million U.S.dollars -- are not enough to meet the country's needs if famine strikes.Associated Press quoted one Western diplomat as saying that the situation could be drastically improved if an internal political solution could be found.He was referring to the tripartite coalition opposition tot he Samrin government.Samrin is supported by an estimated 170,000 Vietnam
    ese troops.The coalition, including the Khmer Rouge and headed by Kampuchea's former leader, Prince Norodom Sihanouk, has up to 47,000 guerrillas at its disposal, according to United States estimates.Fighting between the government and opposition forces is largely concentrated along the Thai-Kampuchea border, escalating during each dry season when mechanized government troops launch offensives.

  • Description

    GV/SV Street scene, with temple in background (2 shots)
    GV Buddhist monks go down steps
    LV ZOOM INTO GV Soldier with Kampuchean flag at memorial
    LVs/GV Bicycles and tricycles in street, and soldiers on motorcycles (3 shots)
    GV Men riding elephants in street
    GV/SVs Meat and vegetables being sold in market (3 shots)
    SVs Women selling rice in market (4 shots)
    GV Busy market
    GVs/SVs Elaborate public fountains in square (4 shots)

    (2.06)
    PD/BB

    Background: The Vietnamese-supported government of Heng Samrin began 1984 facing continuing problems of war and hunger.Internationally, the country remains relatively isolated.The 30 nations and organizations which diplomatically recognize the country are largely from the Soviet bloc.On January 4, President Samrin dedicated a new monument in Phnom Penh to the people as part of the celebrations to mark the fifth anniversary of victory over the former government of Pol Pot.In the capital, the central market was reopened, with stalls selling produce, as well as bicycles, meat and vegetables from state-backed enterprises.Since 1979, the country's basic infrastructure and industries have been partially revived, producing small exports of rubber, wood, and tobacco.However, roads and other communications were recently reported to be in poor condition and machine spare parts and electrical power remained intermittent.Output of rubber, rice and fish food is still well below 1970 levels.Adequate food supplies are a perennial problem.Associated Press reports said the country might have achieved self-sufficiency in rice last year but for a series of natural weather disasters.These setbacks prompted a senior United Nations official to say the prospects for food production over the next few months were very disturbing.Sir Robert Jackson, chief U.N.co-ordinator of Humanitarian Assistance to Kampuchea, said the erratic monsoon had compounded problems of the physical weakness of farmers after years of privation, the sharp drop in the numbers of livestock, lack of fertilizers and the internal security situation.Latest pledges of aid -- standing at less than 10 million U.S.dollars -- are not enough to meet the country's needs if famine strikes.Associated Press quoted one Western diplomat as saying that the situation could be drastically improved if an internal political solution could be found.He was referring to the tripartite coalition opposition tot he Samrin government.Samrin is supported by an estimated 170,000 Vietnam
    ese troops.The coalition, including the Khmer Rouge and headed by Kampuchea's former leader, Prince Norodom Sihanouk, has up to 47,000 guerrillas at its disposal, according to United States estimates.Fighting between the government and opposition forces is largely concentrated along the Thai-Kampuchea border, escalating during each dry season when mechanized government troops launch offensives.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA708I11IU3VLD9NUWP4OMUXMFU
    Media URN:
    VLVA708I11IU3VLD9NUWP4OMUXMFU
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    11/01/1984
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:07:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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