• Short Summary

    In a hard-hitting speech before Moscow television cameras August 1, with a soviet audience of eight million, US Vice-President Nixon made a forceful attack on Soviet foreign policy and an equally forthright defence of the United States.

    "Let us expand the concept of open skies.

  • Description

    In a hard-hitting speech before Moscow television cameras August 1, with a soviet audience of eight million, US Vice-President Nixon made a forceful attack on Soviet foreign policy and an equally forthright defence of the United States.

    "Let us expand the concept of open skies. What the world also needs are open cities, open minds and open hearts. Let us have peaceful competition not only in producing the best factories, but producing better lives for our people. Let us co-operate in our exploration of cuter space. As a worker told me in Novoskibirsk, let us go to the moon together".

    "If we are to have peace, said Mr. Nixon, it must be a peace based on mutual respect rather than the peace of surrender or dictation by either side.

    Putting it bluntly, both of our peoples want peace, but both of us also possess great strength, and much as we want peace, neither of us can, or will tolerate being pushed around."
    Co-existence, he said was a completely "inadequate and negative concept" because it "implies that the world must be divided into two hostile camps with a wall of hate and fear between them.

    "What we need today is not two world: but one world, where different peoples choose the economic and political systems which they want, but where there is free communication among all the peoples living on this earth".

    Mr. Nixon saw two choices facing the Soviet leader, Mr. Khrushchev: "If he devotes his immense energies and talent to building a better life for the people of his own country, Mr. Khrushchev can go down in history as one of the greatest leaders the Soviet people has ever produced; but if he diverts the resources and talents of his people to the objective of promoting the Communication of countries outside the Soviet Union, he will only assure that both he and his people will continue to live in an era of fear, suspicion and tension".

    Mr. Nixon pointed out that American bases on foreign territory were for defence, not for attack. America had disarmed rapidly after the 1939-45 war. Then had come actions like the Berlin blockade and Lorean War to cause rearmament against aggression.

    Listing some practical steps for peace, Mr. Nixon said; "Most important of all, we need a much freer exchange of information between our two countries so that misconceptions we may have and you may have about us may be removed".

    Mr. Nixon's hour-long speech was carried on all eleven stations of the Moscow region television network, and broadcast "live" on 400 stations in the Soviet Sound radio network. Films of the broadcast are to be shown later on local television stations.

    Following day, August 2, Mr. Nixon flew from Moscow to Warsaw, Poland for a two-day visit, where more than 250,000 people gave the American Vice-President and his party" tumultuous welcome.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA6YXSU5YGOR69ZLQH80X5C7N9M
    Media URN:
    VLVA6YXSU5YGOR69ZLQH80X5C7N9M
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    03/08/1959
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Black & White
    Duration:
    00:06:07:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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