• Short Summary

    Thousands of tourists and Brazilians alike visited the Brazilian coastal city of Salvador recently to take part in the colourful "Queen of the Sea Festival."
    The festival is thought to have originated amongst the African slaves brought to Brazil to work on the plantations.

  • Description

    Thousands of tourists and Brazilians alike visited the Brazilian coastal city of Salvador recently to take part in the colourful "Queen of the Sea Festival."
    The festival is thought to have originated amongst the African slaves brought to Brazil to work on the plantations.

    It revolves around "Yemanja" or the "Queen of the Sea", the mother of ocean fertility. Every year those who depend on the sea for their livelihood, such as fishermen, sailors and boat builders dress up in Bahia traditional costume and dance their way down to the beach in a large procession.

    Effigies of the "Yemanja" are carried aloft through the streets of Salvador as street musicians pound out the traditional rhythmic music of the Brazilian people.

    The music, combined with the hot sun and seemingly limitless amounts of fiery, local alcoholic brews, soon turns the procession into a swaying, singing, laughing conga line that winds its way through the city back streets to the sea.

    There, model boats are laden with gifts such as perfumes, gold, jewels, combs, soaps and food. The model boats are then taken abroad a fishing lugger which is sailed out to sea where the model boats and their gifts are cast "to the winds" as offerings to the "Yemanja."
    The gifts are intended to please the goddess of the sea so that she will provide warm sun, good fishing and favourable winds to those who have to sail upon her during the next year.

    SYNOPSIS: The market place in the Brazilian coastal city of Salvador. And thousands of people..... tourists and Brazilians alike...are waiting for the beginning of the colourful Yemanja, or "Queen of the Sea", Festival.

    The Festival is thought to have originated amongst the African slaves brought to Brazil for work on the plantations. It revolves around "Yemanja," the mother of ocean fertility. Every year, those who depend on the sea for their livelihood....fishermen, sailors and boat-builders....dress up in traditional Bahia costume. They then lead a dancing procession down to the beach. People come from all over Brazil to take part in the festival. The atmosphere in the market place beforehand is tense with gay excitement
    Effigies of the Yemanja are prepared with great care during the weeks preceding the festival. The large dolls are carried aloft in front of the procession to win the favour of the sea goddess. Despite the many hours of work out into the making of the images they are cast into the sea at the end of the day.

    The Brazilian's love of festival and life is exemplified in the Yemanja as the gaily dressed participants parade through the crowd. There is much competition for the "best dressed," and much hard work is put into costume-making. The street musicians soon pound out the traditional rhythmic music and the festival gets into full swing.

    The music, combined with the hot sun and apparently huge quantities of fiery alcoholic brew, soon turns the procession into a swaying, singing conga line which winds its way down to the sea. Model boats are laden with gifts such as perfumes, gold and jewels.

    The boats are taken aboard a fishing lugger from which the gifts are cast out to sea. Everyone hopes the gifts will please the Yemanja and provide safety for those who sail upon her during the year.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA6U1DOI3BZGH7TYTLU259YQ6UQ
    Media URN:
    VLVA6U1DOI3BZGH7TYTLU259YQ6UQ
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    07/02/1976
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Black & White
    Duration:
    00:02:05:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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