• Short Summary

    Taiwan failed on Friday (16 July) to win support form the nine-nation Asian and Pacific Council (ASPAC) for keeping its seat in the United Nations.

  • Description

    Taiwan failed on Friday (16 July) to win support form the nine-nation Asian and Pacific Council (ASPAC) for keeping its seat in the United Nations. The blow came at the same time as President Nixon's announcement that he will visit the People's Republic of China before May 1972.

    A communique issued at the end of ASPAC's three-day annual ministerial meeting deleted a reference to continuing support for Taiwan as a member of the United Nations. Taiwan's delegation, led by Foreign Minister Chow Shu-Kai, fought strongly to keep it in the final communique.

    The announcement of President Nixon's proposed visit to the People's Republic of China took ASPAC ministers by surprise. The general reaction was that it was most welcome if it could pave the way for a further relaxation of tension throughout the world and particularly in South-east Asia. The final communique said the ministers expressed their hope that efforts for peace in Vietnam as well as the whole of Indochina would "result in a ceasefire under international supervision and put an end to the war."
    SYNOPSIS: Delegates at the nine-nation Asian and Pacific Council annual ministerial meeting in Manila on Friday failed to support Taiwan's seat in the United Nations. A communique issued on the final day of the meeting deleted a reference to continuing support for Taiwan.

    The blow for Taiwan came at the same time as President Nixon's announcement that he will visit the People's Republic of China before May next year. President Nixon's announcement took the ministers by surprise and the general reaction was that his visit would be most welcome if it could pave the way for a further relaxation of tension throughout the world and particularly in Southeast Asia.

    The Taiwan delegation, led by Foreign Minister Chow Shu-Kai, fought hard to keep the United Nations support paragraph in the final communique. It mentioned that a number of ministers--including Mr. Chow--had expressed their respective views on the new developments between Peking and the United States, and that the ministers agreed that the events should be closely studied. President Marcos of the Philippines told the ministers that it was too early to assess the implications of Peking's diplomatic thaw...although the political climate of Asia had already been affected.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA6R1LQ4WOKLD0C5W6CI4QB57TE
    Media URN:
    VLVA6R1LQ4WOKLD0C5W6CI4QB57TE
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    17/07/1971
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:18:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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