• Short Summary

    Although the Geneva talks on Rhodesia have been adjourned, political activity by the country's black and white politicians continues as both sides try to rally more support.

  • Description

    1.
    CU Black Africans leaving bus (2 shots)
    0.08

    2.
    MV Black Africans boarding bus
    0.16

    3.
    CU Bus drives off
    0.22

    4.
    CU Isaac Samoriwa being interviewed (4 shots)
    2.58


    These blacks therefore had to travel hundreds of miles to the cities where they work for much less than the whites, but Mr. Smith does expect some support from black businessmen. A government department suggested Mr. Isaac Samoriwa as a typical example, but as BBC's reporter Ian Smith found when he spoke to Mr. Samoriwa--there may be less support than the government expects.



    TRANSCRIPT: REPORTER: (IAN SMITH): "Could you say that African businessmen here would be supporting the Nkomo faction or the Muzorewa faction or which?"



    SEQ. 4: SAMORIWA: "The African businessman has not taken any side...which leader to support, but he is supporting the view of any leader who brings in majority rule to the country."



    SMITH: "What kind of society, what kind of state would you want here as a businessman under majority rule?"



    SAMORIWA: "As a businessman I would like to have a very good government, a government that can be trusted by the public and the public can trust who should govern them. That is the government I am looking for."



    SMITH: "At the moment Mr. Smith's government are looking around for support from African business people. They're looking around to see whether there is some kind of unity between the African business world and the Rhodesia Front party should Geneva break down, now are you surprised at that?"



    SAMORIWA: "Well I am surprised because absolutely I would have said this would have been, would have happened, about eleven years ago or before that ten years ago, because at the moment this is the cause that is causing a lot of dalliances and it is wishful thinking that he would get some people who support his views because mostly Africans want to (indistinct) end this Rhodesian trouble immediately and follow up with a good government that they can trust."



    SMITH: "You really have quite a lot to lose if there is not a peaceful settlement here. You have a very nice house, business interests, a lot of money, confidence for the future if everything goes well, but are you confident that there can be a peaceful transition now?"



    SAMORIWA: "Well I am very, very confident that it can be peaceful and these properties that I have got it is no need of saying because I am losing this and that -- I will lose by keeping them without settling it. It is far better that everything can be settled than if I can lose or gain."



    SMITH: "Are you confident after majority rule there will be sufficient stability to guarantee business interests?"



    SAMORIWA: "Well I would say so...there would be, that indeed there would be."



    The conference on the transition of power in Rhodesia from the white minority government to the blacks was adjourned on Wednesday (15 December). The conference, under British chairmanship, could not agree on the timetable or make up of a government to lead the country into black majority rule. The british chairman Mr. Ivor Richard will make a tour of southern African states before reconvening the conference in the New Year.




    Initials BB/1745


    IAN SMITH

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Although the Geneva talks on Rhodesia have been adjourned, political activity by the country's black and white politicians continues as both sides try to rally more support. White Premier Ian Smith's Rhodesian Front party is reportedly hoping for some backing from Rhodesia's black middle class professionals and businessmen -- those who would have most to lose if there were violence. Mr. Smith certainly can't expect any support from the majority of urban and tribal blacks. His government's land apportionment act gave the productive land and the mineral rights to the whites.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA6L84SS3B57VXVV5MT3QH6O4BU
    Media URN:
    VLVA6L84SS3B57VXVV5MT3QH6O4BU
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    17/12/1976
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Black & White
    Duration:
    00:02:58:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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