• Short Summary

    CROSSROADS & KTC CAMPS NEAR CAPE TOWN & KHAYELITSHA TOWNSHIP, FALSE BAY COAST, WESTERN CAPE, SOUTH AFRICA

    The mass removal of Blacks from squatter camps on the outskirts of Cape Town to a remote new township has begun.

  • Description

    NEAR CAPE TOWN - CROSSROADS CAMP
    1. GV Crossroads squatter camp. 0.05
    2. GV Squatters walking near shacks. 0.13
    3. SV Meat on sale at open market. 0.21
    4. CU Man carrying child through camp. 0.26
    5. SVs Squatters playing football. (2 SHOTS) 0.37
    NEAR CAPE TOWN - KTC CAMP
    6. GV KTC squatters camp. 0.43
    7. GVs Shacks with stagnant water filling dirt street between them. (2 SHOTS) 0.53
    8. SV Woman washing outside makeshift tent. 1.00
    9. CU Woman sitting on bed in the open feeding child. 1.05
    10. SV Women digging footings for new makeshift hut. 1.10
    11. SV Women with bundles of wood on heads. 1.17
    12. SV Woman washing clothes in tub. 1.22
    13. GV Women and children sitting inside framework of makeshift tent. 1.26
    14. CU ZOOM OUT TO GV Children playing in hut. 1.36
    15. SV Woman hangs out washing and husbands sits on chair outside shack. 1.47
    KHAYELITSHA, FALSE BAY COAST
    16. GV Newly-built squatters huts. 1.52
    17. GVs & SVs Bulldozers and workmen working on site; surveyor; men taking a tea break. (4 SHOTS) 2.21
    18. GV Families with their belongings outside new homes. 2.27
    19. GVs Families outside huts ZOOM IN TO SV Government official overseeing the move. (2 SHOTS) 2.46
    20. SV Workmen with government official. 2.50
    21. GV People with belongings outside new homes. 2.54
    InitialsCC/JRS


    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: CROSSROADS & KTC CAMPS NEAR CAPE TOWN & KHAYELITSHA TOWNSHIP, FALSE BAY COAST, WESTERN CAPE, SOUTH AFRICA

    The mass removal of Blacks from squatter camps on the outskirts of Cape Town to a remote new township has begun. If the government has its way about a quarter of a million Blacks -- from places such as the Crossroads camp -- will eventually live in Khayelitsha, the new township now under construction. In the 1970s squatter camps mushroomed in the Western Cape as fast as they were torn down by the authorities. Eventually a deal was struck between the authorities and the squatters -- attracted from their homelands by work -- allowing the people of Crossroads to remain unhindered while a new housing project was built. But the inevitable flow of Blacks continued, and smaller camps like those at Nyanga Bush and KTC -- the latter named after the KeKaza Trading Company shop[ opposite - sprung up. It was at this point that the government laid the ground for the plan described by its critics as its "final solution". The big move from Crossroads itself is scheduled for next month. And already the government has started paving the way by having the camp declared a health hazard by Provincial inspectors. On the face of it the squatters might seem to have some reason to be grateful for the move -- from makeshift tents and shacks on unsanitary sites to more permanent buildings on prepared sites: But the squatters are very far from happy. They believe that Khayalitsha is a resettlement camp; out of sight and inordinately far from their places of work. They see the plan as being designed to control the influx of Blacks into the Western Cape. It is only the "legal' people of the camps -- who have registered for jobs and approved accommodation -- who will be moved at Khayelitsha: The many thousands of"illegals" will be deported back to the homelands.Khayelitsha (meaning "new home") is situated some 40 kilometres outside Cape Town. A year ago it was a stretch of desert surrounded by thick bush. Today dozens of earth-moving machines attack the encircling bush and level the undulating dunes. Already, some fifteen thousand people
    are living in Khayelitsha. Community services are being built, but at this stage are still rudimentary. Every week government trucks unload more families, so desperate for housing that the township provides at least some solace. They move into government-provided tin shacks which they are able to convert to more substantial dwellings when they are able. The removal of the squatters Khayelitsha is just one phase of the massive project. The government has already frozen developments in the established townships of Cape Town. It is envisaged that these areas will be used to house thousands of Coloured (mixed race) people who, in terms of the new government reforms, are being given minor political rights -- thereby creating a buffer between Whites and the Black majority.

    Source: JOHN RUBYTHON

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA6KAMUFMN5YSTYX0QN94ANFNG5
    Media URN:
    VLVA6KAMUFMN5YSTYX0QN94ANFNG5
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    08/06/1984
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:55:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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