• Short Summary

    The legal arguments are continuing over Joseph Cahill, the Irish Republican Army (IRA) leader, in the immigration department in New York.

  • Description

    1.
    GV ZOOM IN U.S. Immigration Department
    0.16

    2.
    SCU Reporter on camera outside building
    1.25

    3.
    SV Mr. Cahill's lawyer being interviewed
    2.30

    4.
    CU Reporter on camera
    2.46


    TRANSCRIPT: (SEQ. 4): REPORTER ON CAMERA: It was a day of intricate legal arguments, when Mr. Cahill appeared here again at the Immigration Headquarters in New York, he was asked directly by the examining officer for the precise reason why he had come to America. Mr. Cahill, wearing a brown suit and tie was sitting only a few feet from the judge. Then, in a quiet voice, he replied that he had come to America under the censorship of the Northern Irish Aid Committee to lecture in as many American cities as possible during a three to five week tour. He said he wanted to explain to the American people the present situation in Northern Ireland. The judge, Mr. F. J. Lions , said that Mr. Cahill's Irish passport issued in Dublin, was valid. But his American visa, issued in Belfast, had been revoked by the State Department after he landed at New York's Kennedy Airport last week. A letter from that Department was submitted in evidence today. It set out the legal reasons why he was not admissible -- which included preaches of American immigration laws. One specifically referred to his earlier criminal convictions. After a break in the hearing, Mr. Cahill's lawyer, Mr. Frank Perkins, spoke to newsmen.



    MR. PERKINS: It makes reference to, it makes reference to a, an alleged murder conviction involving Joe Cahill in 1942, at which time a British policeman was killed in Belfast. And for which six people were sentenced to death, one being Joe Cahill.



    U.S. REPORTER: In other words, it's not alleged. There was a murder and Cahill was one of those convicted and imprisoned.



    MR. PERKINS: We say it was not a murder. At the trial that Joe Cahill received among the other five defendants, had a jury from which all Catholics were excluded. He did not receive a trial by a jury of his peers, and I submit that if a black man from Mississippi was convicted under circumstances where no blacks were permitted on the jury, the United States court, the highest court in this land would not regard that as being a proper conviction.



    REPORTER ON CAMERA: Even if Mr. Cahill loses this present fight, here in America, he could still appeal to the immigration appeal court in Washington. Meanwhile the long legal argument over whether he can stay or whether he will be returned to Ireland continues. Brian Saxton, BBC, New York.



    MR. PERKINS: We say it was not a murder. At the trial that Joe Cahill received among the other five defendants, had a jury from which all Catholics were excluded. He did not receive a trial by a jury of his peers, and I submit that if a black man from Mississippi was convicted under circumstances where no blacks were permitted on the jury, the United States court, the highest court in this land would not regard that as being a proper conviction.



    REPORTER ON CAMERA: Even if Mr. Cahill loses this present fight, here in America, he could still appeal to the immigration appeal court in Washington. Meanwhile the long legal argument over whether he can stay or whether he will be returned to Ireland continues. Brian Saxton, BBC, New York.




    Initials OS/145


    TELERECORDING

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: The legal arguments are continuing over Joseph Cahill, the Irish Republican Army (IRA) leader, in the immigration department in New York.

    Cahill was detained when he flew to New York last week on a U.S. tour to increase and widen support for the IRA. He has been locked up on the 15th floor in the immigration building since he was first apprehended at Kennedy Airport.

    Cahill is challenging the American authorities for denying him permission to enter the country on the grounds that he has been convicted of a crime. He served seven and a half years' imprisonment for his part in the killing of a British policeman in Belfast in 1942.

    This film, a telerecording from a satellite feed to the British Broadcasting Corporation, shows BBC reporter Brian Saxton on camera explaining the events of today's (Tuesday's) hearing and then a news interview with Cahill's lawyer Mr. Frank perkins who explains Cahill's side of the crime objection. There is English sound throughout the film.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA6HJIFVAEY0S8F8S4COBWSWAKP
    Media URN:
    VLVA6HJIFVAEY0S8F8S4COBWSWAKP
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    07/09/1971
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:04:07:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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