• Short Summary

    According to the latest figures now available, more than 160,000 refugees who fled to India following the east Pakistan crisis, have now returned to Pakistan.

  • Description

    According to the latest figures now available, more than 160,000 refugees who fled to India following the east Pakistan crisis, have now returned to Pakistan.

    On their way back to their former homes the refugees pass through one or other of the 29 recaption camps set up along the 1700-mile frontier with India. An unknown number are believed to have slipped back quietly direct to their homes.

    BBC reporter Ronald Robson visited Jhikargacha camp near Jessore, on one occasion unannounced, and reports that returning refugees are being well-fed and cared-for by the Pakistan authorities in this camp.

    Most said however, that they had been well-treated in India, but left because of shortage of food, bad conditions, and Danger of disease.

    SYNOPSIS: According to the latest figures now available, more than 160,000 refugees who fled to India have now returned to Pakistan, to the 29 reception camps on the border with India Among the obstacles on the way to the camps is widespread flooding, as int he Jessore district. Reports from Pakistan say the refugees face mined roads and harassment on the indian side, but still they keep getting through to Pakistan.

    Jhikargacha is one of the camps they are bound for. It has helped about three and a half thousand people - mainly Hindus - back to their home villages in the past four months. These new arrivals are Muslims. An unknown number of refugees have found their way back to their former homes on their own.

    There's a strict check to ensure they have really come from India, and are not merely opportunists looking for a handout. After registration and medical checks they can pass the time as they will, and catch up on nourishment in the three days at most they remain in the camp. In their own time they do their own chores and cooking. BBC reporter Ronald Robson, who brought out this film said the refugees were not restricted to set rations and could eat their fill. He was convinced after making a visit unannounced that this was not merely a show place. On his second visit to the camp the reporter found different people, and more of them than on his first. They were both Hindu and moslem. He found the people were able to draw fifteen days rations, and had free transport to get them back to their homes. Pakistani officials claimed that loans of money were also available, and that property taken over in the absence of the refugees would be handed back.

    Most of the refugees interviewed in the camps said they had fled from Pakistan in panic gauchos others were running. They had been well-treated in India, but left because of shortage of food, bad condition and danger of disease. Some had lost Few said they'd experienced difficulty in reaching or crossing the border.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA6HFJRD81W37K3RRP4M3EOWTR7
    Media URN:
    VLVA6HFJRD81W37K3RRP4M3EOWTR7
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    21/09/1971
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:11:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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