• Short Summary

    Crystal Palace in London on Saturday (6 September) was the scene for the British Amateur Athletics Association's centenary championships.

  • Description

    1.
    GV New Zealand runner John Walker leading in Centenary Mile at Crystal Palace in London with Steve Ovett of UK tucked in behind
    0.22

    2.
    GV Ovett drops back to fourth place then moves back to second place
    0.34

    3.
    GV Walker continues to lead with Ovett second as runners end third lap
    1.05

    4.
    GV Start of fourth lap as runner No. 5 challenges for second place
    1.22

    5.
    GV Ovett takes lead and fights off Walker at final bend but Ovett wins
    2.02




    Initials AM



    ENG. TELERECORDING
    BRITISH AMATEUR ATHLETICS ASSO. AND BBC ANY COMMERCIAL SALE TO BE CHECKED WITH BBC ENTERPRISES

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Crystal Palace in London on Saturday (6 September) was the scene for the British Amateur Athletics Association's centenary championships. And the moment which stirred the crowd most was the victory of British athlete Steve Uvett over former Olympic 15-hundred metre champion John Walker of New Zealand in the Centenary Mile.

    SYNOPSIS: Walker, who led for most of the race, provided Ovett with his only genuine challenge. After the event, the New Zealander criticised the tactics of the rest of the field for not stepping up the pace.

    Weather for the meeting was good .. far better than that for the first championships in 1880 when it rained so hard that drips fell from the moustache of mile winner Walter George. Ovett also encountered more opposition that George whose reputation was such that not a single opponent dared line up against him.

    At the beginning of the fourth and final lap, Walker was still loading, with Ovett tucked in behind.

    Coming around the final bend, Ovett took the lead .. and the race, winning easily in the time of four minutes four point four seconds. This was more than fifteen seconds outside his world record. A century ago, George is time was four minutes twenty-eight seconds, and he was in a race all of his own.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA6B925O8EN70A1SV40SEYAUGPB
    Media URN:
    VLVA6B925O8EN70A1SV40SEYAUGPB
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    07/09/1980
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:02:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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