• Short Summary

    New Zealand's two main political parties - National and Labour - have been battling for votes as the nation prepares to go to the polls on 25 November.

  • Description

    1.
    SV New Zealand Labour opposition leader Bill Rowling speaking at rally ZOOM OUT TO crowd watching.
    0.18

    2.
    CU National Party leader and Prime Minister Rovert Muldoon speaking in radio studio. (3 SHOTS)
    0.30

    3.
    SV Muldoon waving to cheering crowd at meeting.
    0.38

    4.
    SV & GV Bill Rowling speaking at meeting (3 SHOTS)
    1.01

    5.
    SV Muldoon speaking at rally.
    1.05

    6.
    SC Hecklers at back of hall.
    1.10

    7.
    SV Muldoon speaking to crowd and being cheered and heckled.
    2.00

    8.
    SV Hecklers shouting at back of hall.
    2.08


    MCHKINNERY:"The campaigning style of the two principle party leaders are as different as their personal styles. Labour Opposition leader, Bill Rowling - Prime Minister for 14 months before being ousted in a general election three years ago - likes to concentrate on meeting people, and holds a series of day-time meetings throughout the country. National party leader, Rob Muldoon, the man who swept into power three years ago, takes part in the occasional phone-in radio programme but to otherwise prefers to put his main effort into evening meetings, for which he has been drawing big audiences. No major issues have emerged in the campaign. National has gone to the country on its record of the past three years, while Labour is promising to place less emphasis on monet, and more on housing and people."



    ROWLING: "If housing young families in this country in decency and security is idealism, then it's about time we has a bit more if it. It's about time we has a bit more of it."



    MCKINNEY: "Prime Minister Muldoon has complained that the New Zealand press is Concentrating its coverage of the election campaign on trivia, but this is in itself a reflection of the way the campaign is going."



    MOLDOON: "This is the face of left-wing totalitarianism in action. This is not something that they allege against the National Party, this is something they try to do against the leader of the National Party, who wants to put his case to the people of Wellington. This is something they do. I don't think the people of New Zealand are frightened of the National Party, but they've got a few qualms about mindless people like those at the back of this hall."



    The election campaign has not been without hitches. Thousands of voters who have registered cannot find their names on the roll and thousands more, including the Prime Minister himself, appear two or three times on the list of voters. Despite this technical hitch, the Government is determines to go ahead with the election.




    Initials JS/0330


    TELERECORDING

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: New Zealand's two main political parties - National and Labour - have been battling for votes as the nation prepares to go to the polls on 25 November. The National Party of Prime Minister, Robert Muldoon, is expected to be returned to power, but opinion polls predict it will be with a reduced majority. At present, the National Party holds 53 of the 87 seats in the New Zealand Parliament, and Labour, 31 seats. Dave McKinney of Television One in New Zealand reports.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA6AWRFP76NHBKNHKECRZFGBLJT
    Media URN:
    VLVA6AWRFP76NHBKNHKECRZFGBLJT
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    22/11/1978
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:08:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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