• Short Summary

    There should be a Channel Tunnel joining the United Kingdom and France by 1980. The?

  • Description

    There should be a Channel Tunnel joining the United Kingdom and France by 1980. The British Government has finally agreed to the project and work will start in two years.

    In 1802 French engineer Albert Mathew wanted to build a carriageway in an undersea tunnel for Napoleon, and French army leader Marshal Foch believed World War I could have been averted if there had been a Channel Tunnel.

    Today's tunnel is only for trains. The engineers have planned three tunnels Two will have single railway tracks with crossovers to prevent blockages, and the third will be for servicing.

    The British Government think the 32 mile (56 km.) tunnel is the cheapest and best way of handling an expected boom in cross-channel traffic, now that Britain is in the European Economic Community.

    Experts estimate the tunnel will reduce the London-Paris rail journey for passengers and freight to three and a half hours. The time by air for city centre to city centre is about the same. The tunnel is reckoned to cost a total of GBP 846 million (2,030 million dollars), but taking freight, it is hoped to save 500,000 lorry trips a year.

    The British Channel Tunnel Company and La Society Francaise du Tunnel sous Le Manche will build it together, but the French and British Governments have agreed to pay the two company's costs if it fails. Unlike the Anglo-French Concorde project, either party can withdraw at any time.

    Both British political parties have backed the scheme for at least fifteen years, so reaction has mainly been favourable.

    Only the 500 villagers of Newington, near Folkestone, close to where the tunnel will emerge on the British side, are unhappy. The County Planning Officer has warned them that the noise from the trains may make their village uninhabitable, and they will lose 350 of surrounding farmland.

    SYNOPSIS: Britons feel the twenty two miles of sea between the white cliffs of Dover and Fra??? have saved them from several invasions. B??? the Channel will finally be conquered, for the British Government have just agreed to an undersea Tunnel which has been the dream of Anglo-French engineers since Napoleon's days.

    Dover harbour will probably lose much os its traffic if the channel tunnel is completed in nineteen eighty as expected. The London-Paris rail journey will take only three and a half hours - about the same as by air.

    This is a model of the tunnel terminus.

    There will be three tunnels. Two will has single railway tracks with crossovers to prevent blockages and the third will be for servicing. Cars will not be able to drive through. The trains will take passengers and freight.

    Experts are examining rock samples from the route under the seabed. The British Channel Tunnel Company and La Society Francaise du Tunnel sous le Manche will build it together, but the French and British governments have agreed to pay the two companies' costs, if the project fail Work is planned to start in two years.

    The estimate for the tunnel is eight hundred and sixty four million pounds. The main British political parties have been in favour for the last fifteen years. On the five hundred villagers of Newington near Folkestone are unhappy. They will suffer the most.

    They will lose three hundred and fifty acres of surrounding farmland. Not surprisingly they think Dover's hover-port terminal and car ferry already provides a sufficient service.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA63XYKP1HKNYMJ6MBQ2KBJNW4P
    Media URN:
    VLVA63XYKP1HKNYMJ6MBQ2KBJNW4P
    Group:
    Reuters - Incuding Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    02/10/1973
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:05:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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