• Short Summary

    A rabbit project at Kwabenya, Ghana, which is seen as a way of providing protein, has reported good progress in line with the country's 'Feed Yourself Operation.' In July least year, the government made money available for the project, with the aim of reducing widespread shortage of meat.

  • Description

    A rabbit project at Kwabenya, Ghana, which is seen as a way of providing protein, has reported good progress in line with the country's 'Feed Yourself Operation.' In July least year, the government made money available for the project, with the aim of reducing widespread shortage of meat.

    Land clearing began in July and the first 50 hutches were ready by August. In September, barns were built; on October 18th the first batch of eighty local rabbits was moved in.

    Rabbits were chosen because they are very adaptable to the local environment, and because they lose the minimum of weight when exposed to stresses such as heat, drought, food shortages and travel. They breed very quickly -- a mature mother rabbit produces between 45 and 64 babies each year. And above all, rabbit meat is richer in protein than either chicken or beef.

    The total rabbit production so far is 1,326 animals. In August, 42 rabbits ware imported form Switzerland for cross-breeding with local varieties.

    The manager of the project is Mr. Newlove Mamattah, of the People's Educational Association of the University of Ghana.

    SYNOPSIS: The national rabbit project in Ghana, at Kwabenya, has been in operation for about a year; and reports so far say it's been going well. The scheme was started as part of 'Operation Feed Yourself' and is seen as a way of providing protein in view of the shortage of meet in the country.

    Mr. Newlove Mamattah of the People's Educational Association of the University of Ghana, is the project manager. Money was first made available in July last year.

    Since then progress has been steady. The first 50 hatches were ready in August, barns were built in September, and on October 18th, the first batch of 80 rabbits was moved in. The rabbit population is now over 1,300.

    A new development came in the middle of August when more than forty rabbits arrived for Switzerland. They're to be crossed-bred with local stock to produce bigger carcasses.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA5YJ0B5E68QQMXA99ZJI3VKIDN
    Media URN:
    VLVA5YJ0B5E68QQMXA99ZJI3VKIDN
    Group:
    Reuters - Incuding Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    31/08/1973
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:00:59:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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