• Short Summary

    In the Khmer Republic, more than one-hundred-thousand villagers have fled fighting zones since 1970 to take shelter in Government-held areas to avoid heavy air-strikes and ground battles.

  • Description

    1.
    GV, SV Boat with me to island (2 shots)
    0.11

    2.
    GV, SV Refugees & children & homes (3 shots)
    0.22

    3.
    GV Troops & official inspect area
    0.29

    4.
    SV Refugees village
    0.32

    5.
    SV, CU Girls shelling kapok (4 shots)
    0.53

    6.
    SV, CU Girls weaving kapok (5 shots)
    1.14

    7.
    SVs, CU Men shredding green tobacco (2 shots)
    1.26

    8.
    SV Girl lays tobacco on mats to dry
    1.34

    9.
    GV, SV Rubber unloaded from barges (2 shots)
    1.46

    10.
    SV Rubber weighted & onto trucks (3 shots)
    2.08

    11.
    GTV Chinese aid factory
    2.14

    12.
    SV Government flag
    2.16

    13.
    GV PAN Khmer girls enter factory to work
    2.24

    14.
    GV US C-130 aircraft on ground
    2.27

    15.
    SV Truck with rice load
    2.32

    16.
    GV C-130 taking off
    2.38

    17.
    SV, GV Trucks leave with rice (2 shots)
    2.46

    18.
    GV Kampong Cham market
    2.50

    19.
    SV, CU Stalls in market (4 shots)
    3.06



    Initials SGM/0026 SGM/0052



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: In the Khmer Republic, more than one-hundred-thousand villagers have fled fighting zones since 1970 to take shelter in Government-held areas to avoid heavy air-strikes and ground battles.

    The influx from the countryside has swollen the population of kampong Cham, sixty miles (96 kilometres) north-east of the capital Phnom Penh, to eighty-thousand people, It's now the second biggest city in the Khmer Republic.

    But the increased communist activity in the fighting zone has cut off Kampong Cham from Phnom Penh, and both communications and supplies are a problem.

    On a small island between Communist lines, ten-kilometres (6 1/2 miles) south of Kampong Cham, refugees have set up homes in bamboo shelters along the Western banks of the Mekong River.

    The refugees live by selling fish, weaving cloth from kapok thread, and preparing tobacco for sale.

    The paradoxes of the war in Indochina are nowhere more apparent than in this area. On the Mekong River bank, for example, two-million kilos of rubber harvested monthly in communist areas arrives freely by boat for unloading at Kampong Cham town. From there, the rough rubber is weighted and loaded onto trucks for delivery to the capital Phnom Penh, where it's manufactured and exported to foreign countries.

    Between the airport and Kampong Cham town, a weaving factory sponsored by aid from The People 's Republic of China is using cotton grown with United States aid. It's turned into government army uniforms, at the rats of five-million metres each year. The factory flies a Khmer Republic flag, and is staffed by local workers.

    Kampong Cham itself is running out of vital supplies, such as petrol, diesel oil, and rice; the city itself has no water, no electric power and no light.

    The rice shortage is proving crucial to the morale of Khmer Government troops, as well as the civilian refugee population. On Saturday, 7th July, Government airforce troops demonstrated for rice.

    United States C-130 freighter aircraft are being used to fly in rice from Phnom Penh. The aircraft fly in at very high altitude, then lose height quickly by circling three times before landing. The aim is to avoid communist anti-aircraft guns.

    Rice is transported to the Kampong Cham market-place, where it can be purchased form blackmarket dealers by the kilo.

    SYNOPSIS: In the Khmer Republic, more than one-hundred-thousand villages have fled fighting zones since 1970, seeking shelter in Government-held areas; the alternatives are ground battles and heavy air-strikes. The influx from the countryside has swollen the population of cities like Kampong Cham, sixty miles north-east of the capital Phnom Penh. Eighty-thousand people live in and around Kampong Cham, making it the second biggest city in the Khmer Republic.

    In this area between communist lines, refugees have set up homes in bamboo shelters. They live by selling fish, and by carrying on the skills they employed in their own villages. Young girls fill their days by shelling kapok fruit of its furry husk, which is woven into cloth on hand-operated looms. Despite the city's strategic importance, on the western banks of the Mekong River, the pace of life among the refugees is slow, reflecting their traditional existence more than the war-ravaged surroundings.

    This man is shredding green tobacco -- another way of making enough to live on, from day to day.

    After shredding, the tobacco is spread out on bamboo mats for drying.

    The paradoxes of the war in Indochina are nowhere more apparent than in this area. On the Mekong River bank, two million kilos of rubber harvested monthly in communist areas arrives freely by boat for unloading at Kampong Cham. From there, the rough rubber is weighed and loaded onto trucks for delivery to Phnom Penh. It's then processed and exported to foreign countries.

    Another paradox -- a weaving factory sponsored by aid from The People's Republic of China uses cotton grown with United States aid. The fabric is turned into government army uniforms at the rate of five-million metres per year.

    United States C-130 freighter aircraft are ferrying in rice from Phnom Penh. The rice supply is crucial for the refugees, and for the morals of Khmer Government troops. The aircraft risk communist gunfire on the approaches to Kampong Cham....
    The rice form Phnom Penh is transported to the Kampong Cham market-place, where it can be purchased from blackmarket dealers by the kilo. But the beleaguered city is running out of vital supplies -- like petroleum -- and has no water or electric power.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA5YB6MQKZ770UYWY63NBZPXSMX
    Media URN:
    VLVA5YB6MQKZ770UYWY63NBZPXSMX
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    16/07/1973
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:03:06:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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