• Short Summary

    Members of the 1,160-man International Control Commission to supervise the 'cease-fire' in Vietnam arrived in Saigon, capital of South Vietnam, on Monday(January 29) and held an hour-long meeting -- but said they were powerless to act as they had received no instructions from the Military Commission, composed of United States, Viet Cong, and North and South Vietnamese representatives.

  • Description

    Members of the 1,160-man International Control Commission to supervise the 'cease-fire' in Vietnam arrived in Saigon, capital of South Vietnam, on Monday(January 29) and held an hour-long meeting -- but said they were powerless to act as they had received no instructions from the Military Commission, composed of United States, Viet Cong, and North and South Vietnamese representatives. Part of the delay, said one official, was due to an impasse at Saigon airport when Viet Cong members of the Military Commission refused to complete immigration formalities -- claiming this would imply recognition of the South Vietnamese Government. They were eventually allowed in without formalities after a 20-hour stalemate.

    The ICC, composed of civilians and troops from Indonesia, Canada, Hungary and Poland, were expected to spread out through South Vietnam to report violations of the cease-fire after receiving demarcation-line instructions from the Military Commission. But as fighting raged on unbroken throughout the country on the second day of the official cease-fire, foreign correspondents said it was unlikely the ICC would expose any of its members to such dangers - and there no recognisable demarcation lines anyway.

    SYNOPSIS: Members of the International Control Commission, to supervise the so-called cease-fire in Vietnam, arrived in Saigon, capital of South Vietnam, on Monday.

    But they admitted they were powerless to act while they hadn't received any instructions and demarcation lines from the Military Commission -- composed of representatives of the United States, the Viet Cong, and North and South Vietnamese. Part of the reason for the delay instructions, they said, was a twenty-hour impasse when Viet Cong members of the Military Commission arriving in Saigon refused to complete immigration formalities -- claiming this would imply recognition of the South Vietnamese Government. They were eventually allowed in without formality. In addition, fighting was still raging on unbroken throughout the country on the second day of the cease-fire -- and foreign correspondents in Saigon said the ICC would be unlikely to expose any of its observers to such dangers.

    The one-thousand-one-hundred-and-sixty-man International Control Commission is made up of civilians and troops from Indonesia, Hungary, Canada and Poland. Later in the day, the Commission had its first meeting -- when twenty officials talked informally for an hour, mainly to get acquainted. Later, some of them admitted that if fighting broke out across the road, they couldn't do anything at all -- they were merely in Vietnam to observe, they said, not fight. PAUSE FOR TEN SECONDS. Meanwhile, as civilian officials and troops of the ICC continued landing, the South Vietnamese military command claimed there were more battle incidents that day than on any other day of the war. And in the past two days Government fores claimed they'd killed more than two thousand communists.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA5V4IW5I22OIPN882DEWQQ3XT7
    Media URN:
    VLVA5V4IW5I22OIPN882DEWQQ3XT7
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    29/01/1973
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Black & White
    Duration:
    00:01:46:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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