• Short Summary

    The first effects of the two-day Geneva conference on humanitarian aid to Kampuchea are already being felt by the thousands of refugees in camps along the border with Thailand.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Relief convoy led by UNICEF jeep (2 shots)
    0.13

    2.
    GV & PAN Refugees gathered at supplementary food distribution centre
    0.24

    3.
    SV Refugee mother with children (2 shots)
    0.32

    4.
    SV Women and children (2 shots)
    0.40

    5.
    SV Women relief worker distributing food to children (2 shots)
    0.51

    6.
    SCU Mother feeds small child
    1.01

    7.
    SV Woman and child sitting in makeshift shelter
    1.04

    8.
    GV PAN Man and woman carrying water in drum
    1.10

    9.
    GV Refugees collecting water from storage tanks
    1.22

    10.
    SV Water being poured into small buckets
    1.26

    11.
    GV Refugees gathered around stacks of sacks of seed rice (3 shots)
    1.42

    12.
    GV Refugees carrying away supplies of seed rice with women and children helping (4 shots)
    2.04




    Initials BB/



    TELERECORDING

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: The first effects of the two-day Geneva conference on humanitarian aid to Kampuchea are already being felt by the thousands of refugees in camps along the border with Thailand. Not only were most of the funds needed by the relief agencies pledged by delegates, but there was also agreement to send more seed, food and agricultural equipment across the border to enable the Kampuchean peasant farmers to re-establish their own rural economy.

    SYNOPSIS: The supplies still have to be flown to Thailand, and driven in convoys to the frontier distribution points. UNICEF and International Red Cross worker provide an escort for the long journey.

    Many of the camps now have a special supplementary food centre to provide fresh fruit and specially balanced meals to mothers and children to overcome the threat of malnutrition. Not only the refugees who have crossed the border to live in the camps, but also families who cross the border almost daily in search of food and relief supplies, receive these meals.

    A Red Cross spokesman said rations were being increased at as many distribution points as possible. The problem was finding sufficient lorries and trucks to ferry the supplies to the frontier. There are few landing strips capable of taking transport aircraft. Even so, the refugees now receive a daily ration of rice, beans and dried fish.

    Another major problem being reviewed is the shortage of fresh water. UNICEF workers have already begun constructing special tanks raised above the ground to keep them accessible even in the approaching monsoon season. Thankers arrive daily with supplies. At the same time, old wells have been cleaned and chlorinated, to supplement the ever-growing demand for fresh water.

    The most significant change, however, is in the increased supplies of seed rice being distributed. This is urgently needed if Kampuchean farmers are to produce a decent rice crop at the end of the year.

    Until recently, each farmer had been limited to 20 kilos (44 pounds) of seed. This has now been increased to 30 kilos (66 pounds). There had been fears that farmers would merely store the grain as a precaution against famine. Now relief monitors have been ale to pinpoint the villages and areas to which the rich is being taken for planting.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA5TUP6S5V44TT2WYV5KMKZ6ST2
    Media URN:
    VLVA5TUP6S5V44TT2WYV5KMKZ6ST2
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    01/06/1980
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:05:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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