• Short Summary

    The Australian Government is to take action to prevent a repetition of extremist activities of some groups of Yugoslavs which have marred the visit of the Yugoslav Prime Minister, Mr.

  • Description

    The Australian Government is to take action to prevent a repetition of extremist activities of some groups of Yugoslavs which have marred the visit of the Yugoslav Prime Minister, Mr. Dzemel Bijedic.

    Mr. Bijedic's three-day goodwill visit, which began on Tuesday (20 March), had to be curtailed because of bomb scares and threats of violent demonstrations.

    On Wednesday (21 March), Mr. Bijedic called off talks with the Special Minister of State at the Department of Foreign Affairs, Senator Donald Willesee, after a hand grenade was found near a bridge on the route his car would have taken.

    Security for the Prime Minister's visit was the most strict ever seen in Canberra, with more than 1,000 police involved. A helicopter gunship and a bullet-proof car also were used in case of action by Croatian extremists.

    On a visit to Parliament House, the Prime Minister's party left by the rear entrance, surrounded by a strong cordon of police, to prevent interference by demonstrators.

    Later, at the National War Museum, Mr. Bijedic laid a wreath in memory of war dead.

    During talks with Australian leaders, Mr. Bijedic assured that Yugoslavia was prepared to sponsor Australia's participation as an observer in coming international talks among non-aligned countries due to be held in Algiers in September.

    A joint communique issued after talks between Mr. Bijedic and the Prime Minister, Mr. Gough Whitlam, said the Australian Government was not satisfied that sufficient action had been taken in the past towards the detection, suppression and expulsion of extremists in Australia engaged in the activities against Yugoslavia, and foreshadowed more vigorous action in future.

    SYNOPSIS: Parliament House in Canberra saw some of the strictest security precautions in the Australian capital's history last Wednesday during the visit of the Yugoslav Prime Minister, Mr. Dzemel Bijedic, on a goodwill tour. Police cordoned off Parliament House and took up vantage points on the roof as the Yugoslav party left the building by the rear entrance in case of interference by demonstrators.

    The Prime Minister's visit, which began on Tuesday, had been marred by bomb alerts and threats of violent demonstration.... mainly from Croatian extremist groups in the country.

    A helicopter gunship and bullet-proof Rolls Royce were among safety precautions taken.

    Later, the visiting Prime, Minister went to Canberra's National War Museum ... shrine to Australia's war dead. Mr. Bijedic laid a wreath at the stone of remembrance. In World War Two, a number of Australian troops died while serving in Yugoslavia.

    During talks with Australian leaders, Mr. Bijedic assured that Yugoslavia was prepared to sponsor Australia's participation as an observer in coming international talks among non-aligned countries due to be held in Algiers in September.

    A joint communique issued after talks between Mr. Bijedic and Prime Minister Mr. Gough Whitlam said the Australian Government planned vigorous action in the detection, suppression and expulsion of extremists in Australia engaged in activities against Yugoslavia. Mr. Bijedic praised the Government's attitude. Later he left for New Zealand.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA5LTVOT6EW2ZBG7GEG8OAFFR9C
    Media URN:
    VLVA5LTVOT6EW2ZBG7GEG8OAFFR9C
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    24/03/1973
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:59:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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