• Short Summary

    The drought in West Africa -- said to be the worst in sixty years -- ???

  • Description

    The drought in West Africa -- said to be the worst in sixty years -- ??? continuing to parch the Sahel Zone embracing Mauritania, Mali, Chad, Niger, Senegal and Upper Volta.

    Life for an estimated twenty-million people in the region is steadily ???rsening as the Sahara desert extends further south. Cattle and crops have ???n dying in temperatures reaching about 50 degrees centigrade (122 degrees fahrenheit).

    The World Food Organization says Mauritania is the country worst affected by the drought. Eighty percent of its population are nomads, who've ???en forced to gather on the outskirts of towns for food supplies.

    In the inland town of Boutilimit, nomads are having to walk more than ???x miles (ten kms) to obtain water. Wells have to be 240 feet (70ms) deep ??? reach water.

    Abidjan, in the Ivory Coast, is fast becoming a vital relay point ???r aid flowing into the drought stricken countries.

    France has despatched fifteen of its military trucks based in the Ivory Coast to carry relief supplies to Upper Volta. The trucks will make two ???urneys a week for about the next three months, carrying powdered milk, ???ain and other staple foods.

    Trains ferrying rice, sorghum, sugar and corn -- much of it donated the European Common Market -- are making regular trips into Mali and Upper Volta.

    Among the supplies awaiting transhipment on the docks at Abidjan on ???nday (9 July) were 800 tons of salt and 1,000 tons of rice for Upper Volta, ???d 9,500 tons of rice and 1,500 tons of sugar for Mali.

    SYNOPSIS: The drought in West Africa -- said to be the worst in sixty years -- is continuing to wipe out livestock and crops as the Sahara Desert extends further south. The World Food Organisation says Mauritania is the country worst affected.

    An estimated twenty-million people in six countries are experiencing drought conditions. At Boutilimit in Mauritania, nomadic tribesmen are walking more than six miles to obtain water. Wells in the village are 240 feet deep, while temperatures have been reaching about fifty degrees centigrade. Many of Mauritania's nomads have been forced into the towns to get food supplies.

    Abidjan, in the Ivory Coast, is fast becoming a vital relay point for relief aid flowing into the drought-stricken countries. Among supplies awaiting transhipment at the Abidjan docks on Monday were 800 tons of salt and 1,000 tons of rice destined for Upper Volta; and 9,500 tons of rice and 1,500 tons of sugar for Mali.

    Trains ferrying rice, sorghum, sugar and corn -- much of it donated by the European Common Market -- are making regular trips into the drought lands. As well, France has despatched fifteen military trucks to carry relief supplies into Upper Volta. The trucks will make two trips a week for about the next three months, each journey lasting three days.

    A United Nations official says the drought -- the product of five consecutive dry seasons -- is causing the progressive deterioration of the West African environment.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA5L6HD2TMICPQTI1TZFYF07UE5
    Media URN:
    VLVA5L6HD2TMICPQTI1TZFYF07UE5
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    13/07/1973
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:46:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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