• Short Summary

    INTRODUCTION: The publishers of two recently-suspended South African newspapers aimed as black have relaunched their Sunday publication, The Sowetan, as a daily.

  • Description

    1.
    GV EXTERIOR "Sowetan" offices.
    0.05

    2.
    SCU Post Transvaal, Argus Printing and Publishing Ltd, signs, ZOOM IN TO new "Sowetan" sign.
    0.11

    3.
    GV INTERIOR Editorial office, journalists at work. (2 SHOTS)
    0.30

    4.
    GVs Compositors making up pages, setting type. (3 SHOTS)
    0.58

    5.
    CU & SV Compositor pasting up pictures. (2 SHOTS)
    1.18

    6.
    CU Picture of naked girl on page.
    1.23

    7.
    SCU Editor Latakgomo listening to question.
    1.31

    8.
    SCU Latakgomo speaking.
    2.19


    SPEECH ON FILM (TRANSCRIPT)



    THORNE: "But aren't you in danger, like the Post, of being closed down by the government? Haven't you got to be very careful?"



    SEQ. 8: LATAKGOMO: "Well, there is a danger always, but I think, in our situations at the moment - whatever we do - we, I think, are in a no-win situation anyway."



    THORNE: "What will your editorial policies be? Will you still be a political voice for the black people of South Africa?"



    LATAKGOMO: "We will serve as a mirror of black society. We will reflect the black people's aspirations - political and otherwise - and we hope that the images that we reflect will bring a message home to the government, and they will do something to right whatever wrongs we may be able to expose."





    Initials JS



    REPORTER: JOHN THORNE

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: INTRODUCTION: The publishers of two recently-suspended South African newspapers aimed as black have relaunched their Sunday publication, The Sowetan, as a daily. The first issue was published on Monday (2 February).

    SYNOPSIS: The Argus publishing company, which owns The Sowetan, was told recently that two of its other titles -- The Post and Sunday Post -- had lost their right to publish because of a strike. But many Sowetan journalists were among those who took part in the stoppage. Technically, the papers were penalised because they failed to appear for a month, and forfeited their official registrations.

    Both newspapers were told that, if they re-applied for permission to appear, they would be banned. And South Africa's largest circulation among blacks, forfeited their rights to publish because the government felt they were trying to create a climate of revolution. He was replying to a storm of protest - not only from opposition sources - at what many saw as an attempt to inhibit the freedom of the press. As the first issue of the daily version of The Sowetan was prepared for publication, editor Joe Latakgomo told John Thorne of the BBC what the newspaper planed to do, and of the impact it wanted to achieved.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA5KNEC9DIRCKAKYCDC7VUXDPE9
    Media URN:
    VLVA5KNEC9DIRCKAKYCDC7VUXDPE9
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    02/02/1981
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:20:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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