• Short Summary

    DE HOOP NATURE RESERVE, NEAR ARNISTON, SOUTH AFRICA

    Plans by the government to turn a nature reserve in the Cape Province into a missile testing range have run into large-scale opposition.

  • Description

    1. GV & SV De Hoop Nature Reserve, and park sign (2 shots) 0.13
    2. GVs Flamingoes on lake, with gazelles running in background (2 shots) 0.32
    3. GV Virgin coastline 0.40
    4. GV Pride of lions 0.46
    5. GV Zebras 0.53
    6. SV Small group of gazelles 1.01
    7. GV & PAN Bird scuttles along ground 1.04
    8. GV & PAN Coastline and sandy beach (2 shots) 1.36
    9. GV & PAN Boats on beach and fisherman's hut (2 shots) 1.36
    10. SCU Resident Mr John Michler speaks (SOT) 2.29
    11. SVs Citizens sign anti-missile site petition (5 shots) 2.54
    TRANSCRIPT (SEQUENCE 10):
    RICHLER: "Well, naturally, having been here for close on 30 years, 29 in fact, we feel very bitter about it. Over that period of time, we have, apart from our farming, we -- been very keen on our conservation sites. We feel that this area is a unique conservation area by virtue of the fat that we have the flowers, birds, and, along the coast, the fish, which have been protected. Now, when this takeover comes, if it comes, we feel that the movement of, I should imagine, troops, and whatever else is involved, aeroplanes and helicopters, I can't see that the ecology is going to remain undisturbed, and, basically, this is my great fear."
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    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: DE HOOP NATURE RESERVE, NEAR ARNISTON, SOUTH AFRICA

    Plans by the government to turn a nature reserve in the Cape Province into a missile testing range have run into large-scale opposition. At least 15,000 people have signed a petition protesting against the plan to turn the De Hoop Nature Reserve into a missile testing range for Armscor (Armaments Development Corporation). Conservationists from the Wildlife Society of Southern Africa said thousands of animals would be killed and one of the country's most attractive parks ruined. Large numbers of birds and animals, including lions, zebras, and several types of gazelle, inhabit the reserve, which covers thousands of square hectares (acres). The fishing hamlet of Skipskop lies within the park, and its residents, some of whom have been there for four generations, would have to be moved out if the plan went ahead. Another farmer, John Michler, would also have to leave as his farm was designated target area in the missile site plan. He has been there for almost 30 years, and said he felt very bitter about the prospect of moving. He said the park has a unique conservation area and that it would be ruined if troops and heavy vehicles were to use it. Armscor, which employed 23,000 people in its eight manufacturing subsidiaries, was established in 1968, and since the United Nations 1977 embargo on supplying arms or production licences to South Africa, has concentrated on developing an indigenous arms production industry. Recently in nearby Cape Town, several hundred more residents signed the wildlife society's petition to the government against the missile site plan.

    Source: REUTERS - MIKE GAVSHON

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA5CRBTASWI9ED5CKTDBKWQJS7B
    Media URN:
    VLVA5CRBTASWI9ED5CKTDBKWQJS7B
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    20/04/1983
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:54:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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