• Short Summary

    When the Apollo 14 mission to the moon is launched from Cape Kennedy, it will look like this: The five engines of the first stage Saturn V launch vehicle fire about 2 1/2 minutes, applying more than 7 1/2 million pounds of thrust to carry the mission 45 miles down range and to a speed of 9,000 feet per second.

  • Description

    When the Apollo 14 mission to the moon is launched from Cape Kennedy, it will look like this: The five engines of the first stage Saturn V launch vehicle fire about 2 1/2 minutes, applying more than 7 1/2 million pounds of thrust to carry the mission 45 miles down range and to a speed of 9,000 feet per second.

    Retrorockets then fire to separate the spent first stage. Ullage rockets in the interstage fire, then the five engines of the second stage ignite. The interstage is jettisoned and 30 seconds after second stage ignition the Launch Escape System is jettisoned.

    When the second stage separates, after a burn of 6 minutes, velocity has increased to 15,300 miles per hour, 840 miles downrange.

    The third stage engine ignites for its first burn to place the vehicle into earth orbit after a burn of 2 1/2 minutes.

    Until now monitored by Flight Controllers on the ground, the computer and an inertial guidance reference system have guided the mission.

    Once the earth parking orbit is attained, the crew in the Command Module report their instrument readings to the ground.

    Mission Control verifies the safe orbit from their readings and from the worldwide network of ground tracking stations.

    The circular orbit is 103.3 nautical miles above the earth.

    In addition to checking out systems, the crew submit to medical exams by doctors in Houston: heart rate, respiration, and other vital signs.

    Flight Controllers analyze orbital flight performance, compare system and guidance information from tracking stations and the space vehicle.

    The Control Center then updates the onboard computer. Final flight path computations are made. Only the Mission Director in the Mission Operations Control Room can decide whether the mission is "Go" for the moon.

    If the decision is "Go" the crew prepare for the second burn of the third stage S-IVB engine.

    Ignition is scheduled for 2 hours, 30 minutes, 38 seconds ."G.E.T." - (ground elapsed time) after liftoff.

    Translunar Injection by the S-IVB burn places the mission on a free return trajectory to the moon.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA5C8U6BS5JJW4GOYBS9CSGZIG7
    Media URN:
    VLVA5C8U6BS5JJW4GOYBS9CSGZIG7
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    16/12/1970
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:53:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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