• Short Summary

    In manila security forces were full alert while the government and Opposition studied the implications of last week's elections for an interim National Assembly.

  • Description

    In manila security forces were full alert while the government and Opposition studied the implications of last week's elections for an interim National Assembly. The New Society Movement of President Ferdinand Marcos, the only party to contest the elections nationwide, was assured of a big majority in the assembly. But opposition supporters have been protesting at alleged vote rigging by the government.

    Polling in the Philippines first elections for a 200-seat interim national assembly under martial law ended without major incidents on Friday (April 7th), despite some minor scuffles near voting booths and a noisy demonstration on the eve by opposition supporters.

    Most of the country's more than 20 million voters trooped to the polls in bright sunshine. Voting was particularly heavy in the Capital.

    Metropolitan manila has become the centre of the contest because the President Ferdinand Marcos's New Society Movement, led by his wife Imelda, faces its stiffest opposition in Manila against a People's Power Group led by detained former Senator Benigno Aquino.

    Mr. Aquino has been in Military detention since the start of martial law accused of being subversive. Aquino was allowed to vote in his detention quarters.

    President Marcos chose to fly to Batac, his hometown in the far north, and voted.

    President Marcos accused the opposition of trying to wreck the voting, and threatened to arrest opposition leaders including candidates if there was any sign of violence in the first elections in nearly six years of Martial law.

    The first leady, Imelda, casted her vote near the Presidential Palace in Manila.

    Mrs. Marcos, leading a team that includes 79-year-old elder statesman, Foreign Secretary Carlos Romulo, has the country's toughest battle in the elections for the 21 seats at stake in Metropolitan Manila.

    In an instant interview at the voting office, Mrs. Marcos said, "You see Metro Manila is 97 per cent literacy, you cannot fool the people in Metro Manila. They have to see your performance, and This the issue of the election here in Metro Manila."
    SYNOPSIS: On Friday (7 April) most of the Philippines' more than 20 million voters trooped to the polls bright sunshine. It was the first election under six years of martial law in the country and voting day ended without major incident despite some minor scuffles near polling booths.

    President Ferdinand marcos chose to fly to his Home-town of Batac in the far north to cast his own vote. He accused the opposition of trying to wreck the voting, and threatened to arrest opposition leaders including candidates if there was any sign of violence during the elections. His wife, Imelda cast her vote near the Presidential palace in Manila. Mrs Marcos led a team for the 21 seats at stake in Metropolitan Manila. She spoke to reporters at the voting office.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA58Q73HVUAOIABW61W5BP7JFR8
    Media URN:
    VLVA58Q73HVUAOIABW61W5BP7JFR8
    Group:
    Reuters - Incuding Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    09/04/1978
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:08:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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