• Short Summary

    The Russian Chess Champion, Boris Spassky, gave an exhibition of his skill in New York on Tuesday (5 February), during which he played against forty-one other players simultaneously.

  • Description

    1.
    SV Spassky arrives and takes off coat
    0.13

    2.
    SV Audience applauding
    0.14

    3.
    SV Spassky presented with roses by girl while audience looks on (2 shots)
    0.24

    4.
    SV Spassky playing along line of chess boards
    0.29

    5.
    SV Contestant studying board
    0.32

    6.
    SV Boards as Spassy moves away down line
    0.35

    7.
    SV Young girl competitor
    0.37

    8.
    SV Spassky playing line of board while audience watches (6 shots)
    0.50

    9.
    SV Three contestants study boards
    0.51

    10.
    SV Spassky playing along line of boards
    0.58

    11.
    CU Contestant and PAN DOWN TO pile of pieces on board
    1.01

    12.
    SV Same contestant being interviewed
    1.28

    13.
    SV Over shoulder of another competitor TILT UP TO Spassky playing and moving on
    1.44

    14.
    SV Spassky playing along line of boards
    1.57


    COMPETITOR: "Playing a piece down is hard enough when you are playing against someone your own speed. It's presumptious to play a piece down against the former world champion, so I resigned."



    REPORTER: "What do you mean, you lost a piece? Would you perhaps go for a draw?"



    COMPETITOR: "Er, very remote possibility. But or the thing is, with a guy as good as Spassky or top, world top at chess, with fairly rum dum people like us, there's no problem at all."




    Initials BB/1748 NPJ/CD/BB/1807


    SPORT: CHESS

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: The Russian Chess Champion, Boris Spassky, gave an exhibition of his skill in New York on Tuesday (5 February), during which he played against forty-one other players simultaneously. the exhibition was held at Chess City, the Chess emporium on Broadway.

    In just under five hours, Spassky won thirty-two of the matches, drew eight, and lost one. The forty-one competitors sat in rows around the room, with their chess boards in front of them. On average Spassky took only two-and-a-quarter minutes to complete a circuit of all his opponents, spending something like three seconds on each move. The Russian Grandmaster took less than half an hour to beat his first "victim".

    Spassky, who lost his World Championship title to the American, Bobby Fischer, in 1972, retained his Soviet Championship title in October last year. Among the five Russian players who shared second place was 22 year-old Antoly Karpov. Karpov's tournament results last year placed him in second place to Fischer in internation 1 rankings.

    Earlier this month Karpov defeated Polugayevsky to qualify him for a semi-final match with spassky in the World Championship tournament to find a challenger for Fischer. Spassky and Karpov are expected to meet in April to decide who should play Fischer for the World Title.

    Sound on film includes reporter's interview with failed competitor:

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA58P09CFKOX5JNX6DZPK8CSTLU
    Media URN:
    VLVA58P09CFKOX5JNX6DZPK8CSTLU
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    07/02/1974
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:58:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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