• Short Summary

    In the last twelve years of fighting in Vietnam, about one-million one-hundred and fifty-nine-thousand combatants have been killed.

  • Description

    In the last twelve years of fighting in Vietnam, about one-million one-hundred and fifty-nine-thousand combatants have been killed.

    In South Vietnam itself, one-hundred and eighty-three-thousand Government soldiers and well over one-million one-hundred and thirty-five thousand civilians have died as a result of combat since 1961.

    When the announced ceasefire is signed and goes into effect on Saturday (27 January) the guns will fall silent. What remains will be families mourning their dead and people returning to their homes to begin the long reconstruction process.

    The National Military Cemetery in Saigon is filled with fallen South Vietnamese soldiers. The graves are visited and tended regularly by families of the dead. The Government issues no official death certificates and the families don't want their loved ones forgotten once peace comes to the country.

    Catholics and Buddhists alike pray at the cemetery. And as the Tet lunar new year approaches, the number of families visiting there has increased dramatically. For many, the National Military Cemetery, filled with thousands of soldiers, holds not only the bodies, but memories, of those fathers, sons and brothers killed in action.

    SYNOPSIS: On Saturday, the guns of war that have been raging across Vietnam for many years will be silenced. But the marks of war will remain for some time. The National Military Cemetery in Saigon is the last resting place of thousand of South Vietnamese troops killed in combat.

    This family mourns what could be one of the last men to fall in battle. Since 1961, one-hundred and eighty-three-thousand soldiers have died. Many of them are buried in this cemetery.

    While the ceasefire agreement will stop further killing, these graves will be a constant reminder of the damage war can do to a country and its people.

    Families visit these graves and tend them regularly. As the Government issues no official death certificates for soldiers killed in action, the families are afraid that, with the end of the fighting, their fathers, sons and brothers may be forgotten. Presents are left on the graves as a sign that the fallen men are remembered by some... As the South Vietnamese bury the last of their war dead, the massive programme of rebuilding and protecting the peace will begin.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA561J3NG0646KILWW0V5ZH5I2Y
    Media URN:
    VLVA561J3NG0646KILWW0V5ZH5I2Y
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    24/01/1973
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:24:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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