• Short Summary

    People in Warsaw were able to go to the theatre on Saturday (16 January) for the first time since martial law was imposed in Poland.

  • Description

    1.
    SV PAN DOWN EXTERIOR Warsaw theatre with people going in. (2 SHOTS)
    0.16

    2.
    SV INTERIOR Theatre-goers in foyer.
    0.22

    3.
    SV PAN People in ticket queue. (3 SHOTS)
    0.34

    4.
    SVs People in theatre foyer talking, taking off coats.(4 SHOTS)
    0.50

    5.
    GV Theatre curtain goes up.
    0.56

    6.
    SV Audience watches play.
    1.01

    7.
    SV Scenes from play. (2 SHOTS)
    1.17

    8.
    SV PAN Audience applaud.
    1.28

    9.
    SCU Ed Halts, graduate student studying in Cracow speaking. (4 SHOTS)
    1.57

    10.
    CU Ted Yates, graduate student studying at Cracow, speaking. (3 SHOTS)
    2.21


    TRANSCRIPT: HALTS: "Most of the people we have talked to, professors and other people who are part of the intellectual community down there feel that the situation here is hopeless. They despair, and a lack of hope is the best way to describe at least the depression and the way people have reacted. They just see no hope for the future of this country, they see no hope for their children, and many of them we have talked to have a strong desire to leave."



    YATES: "Well, we know of particular students in cells, we have a contact with an individual who was there, who are arrested, it's a young female student. She was beaten once on the side of the face with a club and once on the back. They came in with tanks, with water tanks, we know another thing, and just blasted everybody."





    Initials





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: People in Warsaw were able to go to the theatre on Saturday (16 January) for the first time since martial law was imposed in Poland. The offerings were limited. Cinemas showed uncontroversial offerings such as "Gone With the Wind", and "A Star is Born", featuring Barbara Streisand. Still banned, however, were satirical cabarets with potential for offering criticism of the military government. One play which was widely attended was a sophisticated comedy written in the 1930's, in which the villain, a Polish fascist brags that he is a friend of Adolph Hitler. There were, however, a few anti-Soviet lines, and the audience laughed at these. Meanwhile two American graduate students, who have been studying at Cracow University, have spoken of their experience in Poland. Ed Halts said the atmosphere in Poland now was simply one of despair. Ted Yates said many students in Cracow were ill treated by the military authorities.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA53TLDU7EXAZ75CJF1R54LANF6
    Media URN:
    VLVA53TLDU7EXAZ75CJF1R54LANF6
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    18/01/1982
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:21:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

Comments (0)

We always welcome comments and more information about our films.
All posts are reactively checked. Libellous and abusive comments are forbidden.

Add your comment