• Short Summary

    Viet Cong supply routes in South Vietnam are frequently attacked by Air Force fighter-bomber aircraft as shown in this Air Force film released today by the Department of Defense.

  • Description

    Viet Cong supply routes in South Vietnam are frequently attacked by Air Force fighter-bomber aircraft as shown in this Air Force film released today by the Department of Defense. These strikes conducted before the 1967 Tet truce period are on military targets located in the western areas of South Vietnam along the Laos and Cambodian border, and in the delta region.

    These first scenes show F-4C's making strafing passes against a night-time operation by the Viet Cong near the Cambodian border just west southwest of Pleiku, F-100's firing rocket into an enemy riverside stronghold 98 miles west southwest of Saigon, and A1E's and F-100's striking roads and Viet Cong bunkers in a Viet Cong concentration area about 60 miles southwest of Saigon.

    In a close air support strike B-57's drop 500-pound bombs on a Viet Cong troop concentration in War Zone C, about 42 miles northwest of Saigon.

    Also shown is a Viet Cong troop convoy being strafed by A1E's about 80 miles southwest of Saigon, and AlE's strafing a Viet Cong pack train in the highlands 35 miles northeast of Kon Tum.

    These last scenes show T-100's bombing Viet Cong bunkers and fortified positions on a road 15 miles north of Saigon, and strafing Viet Cong fortifications along a river 35 miles southwest of Can Tho.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA53QMK252Y8IDOZ9CJZVU5M96H
    Media URN:
    VLVA53QMK252Y8IDOZ9CJZVU5M96H
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    17/02/1967
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Black & White
    Duration:
    00:02:53:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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