• Short Summary

    Pakistan's arts and crafts -- some dating back thousands of years -- have been put on show for the country's 27th Independence anniversary.

  • Description

    Pakistan's arts and crafts -- some dating back thousands of years -- have been put on show for the country's 27th Independence anniversary.

    Pakistan came into being on 14 August, 1947, when the british Raj ended. The country is mainly Muslim and divided into four provinces -- the Punjab, the North West Frontier, sind and Baluchistan.

    For some years after independence, rapid industrialisation saw a sharp decrease in both the demand and production of handicrafts. But in recent years -- with Government support -- this trend had been progressively reversed.

    The Pakistan government poured large sums of money into small industries with the specific aim of "preserving and promoting traditional arts and crafts". Today, machine-made products -- particularly carpets and textiles -- are visibly influenced by the high standards of design and craftsmanship of the traditional handicrafts.

    Exquisite colourful fabrics of silk and cotton have been woven by craftsmen of the subcontinent since ancient times. Despite the existence of modern textile mills, the spinning wheel remains an essential part of village life, turning out the cloth used for daily wear.

    The potter at his wheel is also a common sight in every village in Pakistan. Uninfluenced by modern Western forms, the potter turns out utensils and vases in shapes proven by tradition. The more ornate works are painted with bright colours, or glazed.

    Elaborate wooden sculpture is an integral part of the cottage architecture of many areas of Pakistan. Used to adorn anything from musical instruments to furniture, woodwork is an ancient art. Less common today are the elaborate carvings inlaid with gold, jewels or ivory.

    For its 27th anniversary, the country has become a showcase for one of the oldest surviving cultures in the world.

    SYNOPSIS: Pakistan's arts and crafts -- some dating back thousands of years -- have been put on show for the country's twenty-seventh Independence Anniversary. Pakistan came into being on the fourteenth of August, nineteen forty seven, when the British Raj ended. For some years after independence, rapid industrialisation saw a sharp decrease in both the demand and production of handicrafts. But in recent years -- with help from the Government -- this trend has been progressively reversed.

    Today, machine-made products are visibly influenced by the high standards of design and craftsmanship of the traditional handicrafts. Wood carving is among the oldest crafts and elaborate wood sculpture is an in???gral part of the cottage architecture of much of Pakistan. Carving is used to adorn anything from musical instruments to furniture.

    Pottery is another of the ancient arts. The potter at his wheel is a common sight in every village in Pakistan. He turns out utensils and vases in shapes proven by time and tradition. Pakistan's musical instruments are as distinct as the music they make.

    Pakistan is mainly Muslim. But it is divided into four provinces with distinct regional customs and dress. For its twenty-seventh anniversary, the country has become a showcase of one of the oldest surviving cultures in the world.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA50CH1NB05FSCNCSXX6THNQQEM
    Media URN:
    VLVA50CH1NB05FSCNCSXX6THNQQEM
    Group:
    Reuters - Incuding Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    14/08/1974
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:29:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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