• Short Summary

    An industry that makes use of discarded flamingo feathers has grown up near Kenya's Lake Nakuru, about 100 miles (160 kms) north-west of Nairobi.

  • Description

    An industry that makes use of discarded flamingo feathers has grown up near Kenya's Lake Nakuru, about 100 miles (160 kms) north-west of Nairobi.

    The feathers are arranges in the form of flowers of all shapes and colours.

    The industry was launched just over four years ago by Mrs. Helen Kellogg, wife of a missionary. Now she employs a staff of eight and her feather "flowers" are sent all round the world.

    The feathers come from the hundreds of thousands that are dropped by the vast number of flamingos living on Lake Nakuru. No birds are harmed in any way.

    Special permission had to be obtained from the board of trustees of the Kenya National Parks to gather the feathers along the shores of the lake.

    Each day two members of Mrs. Kellogg's staff collect the feathers for washing drying and sorting into up to 90 categories, according to shape and colour.

    Colours vary from brown, crimson, flame and pastel pink to bluish white, producing a wide range of "flowers" from roses and carnations to orchids.

    According to design, trained artisans can make up to 50 flowers a day--each one individually hand-made.

    Profits from the sale of the "flowers", which find a market round the world, are used for the philanthropic work of the World Gospel Mission.

    SYNOPSIS: Flamingo wander the shores of Kenya's Lake Nakuru...a colourful tourist attraction n the East African country renowned for its wildlife. But the flamingo population has become the means to another small income for kenyan mission work. An industry has frown up making use of the feathers the birds drop during their everyday life.

    In this workshop, at Nakuru, on the banks of the lake, the feathers are sorted into up to ninety categories, according to shape and colour. They come in shades from brown, crimson, flame and pastel pink, to bluish white.

    From them, a staff of eighty Kenyan workers produces beautifully realistic "flowers"....ranging from roses and carnations to orchids. According to design, the trained artisans can make up to fifty flowers a day....each individually hand-made.

    Each feather is carefully glued to a "stem" and arranged according to the type of "flower" being made.

    The industry is the idea of Mrs. Helen Kellogg, wife of a missionary. At first, she had to obtain special permission from the board of trustees of the Kenya National Parks to gather the hundreds of thousands of feathers that are washed up along the shores of the lake. But the fact that the collection of feathers would help reduce pollution and at the same time support wildlife conservation programmes, ensured permission was forthcoming.

    Profits from the sale of the "flowers", which find a market round the world, are used for the philanthropic work of the World Gospel Mission.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA509B33VOVFR0JRLB0FVTFXALQ
    Media URN:
    VLVA509B33VOVFR0JRLB0FVTFXALQ
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    09/12/1972
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:39:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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