• Short Summary

    When most people think of Kangaroos, they imagine very powerful animals bounding across the Australian outback.

  • Description

    1.
    CU ZOOM OUT FROM Kangaroo to group feeding
    0.10

    2.
    SV & CU Sign outside Kangaroo Park "Kangaroos need Friends" (2 shots)
    0.21

    3.
    SV & CU Mr. Garth Moreland feeding and talking to kangaroos (4 shots)
    0.45

    4.
    CU PAN FROM Joey in pouch TO mother being fed through fence
    0.54

    5.
    LV & CU PAN Mr. Moreland carries Blue Boy out of hospital building for physiotherapy (2 shots)
    1.07

    6.
    CU Woman watches from road
    1.10

    7.
    CU ZOOM OUT Mr. Moreland gives Blue Boy physiotherapy as woman watches
    1.47

    8.
    SV Kangaroo carrying joey in pouch rolls over
    1.54

    9.
    CU Mr. Moreland explains how baby wallaby was found and then he wraps it up and feeds it
    2.13

    10.
    CU Baby wallaby feeding on bottle
    2.37



    Initials BB/1930



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: When most people think of Kangaroos, they imagine very powerful animals bounding across the Australian outback. But now, the not-so-healthy and orphaned kangaroos have somewhere to go.

    SYNOPSIS: These kangaroos and wallabies are the occupants of an unusual hospital and orphanage at Dural, north of Sydney in Australia. The ailing marsupials wander around the 5 1/2 acres (2.3 hectares) "Kangaroo Park" where a sign calls on visitor to take a greater interest in kangaroos. the hospital is run by a 65-year-old pensioner, Garth Moreland.

    Mr. Moreland started by tending kangaroos and wallabies which had been injured by traffic and now has a complete treatment centre. He also provides emergency lodgings for "Joeys" -- baby kangaroos whose mothers have been killed by cars or shot.

    One of Mr. Moreland's most favoured patients is Blue boy. The kangaroo was found paralysed by the roadside two years ago after being knocked down by a car. Mr. Moreland gave Blue Boy mouth-to-mouth resuscitation and now applies daily physiotherapy to try and bring back the use of the kangaroo's limbs.

    Blue Boy spends most of his time in a hammock on the verandah of Mr. Moreland's home. Some of the day is spent asleep on his exclusive three-inch (7.6 centimetres) foam rubber bed or in doing his exercises.

    Another visitor at Kangaroo Park is a baby swamp wallaby, taken from the paunch of its dead mother. Mr. Moreland has made a special replica of the pouch to reassure the baby wallaby and feeds it six times a day on cow's milk.

    Mr. Moreland's Kangaroo Park attracts many visitors and he wants the Australian government to set aside much larger areas for the kangaroos. In his view, the kangaroo is threatened with extinctions through the actions of man and feels that special farms would help conserve the unique Australian species. In the meantime, Mr. Moreland will carry on looking after as many injure and orphaned marsupials as he can.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA4Y1ZGCUICCSLGT9HC0THNG380
    Media URN:
    VLVA4Y1ZGCUICCSLGT9HC0THNG380
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    22/08/1976
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:38:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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