• Short Summary

    Deaf children need special training to enable them t o take an active and useful place in society - and many African countries recognise the need to provide the education these children need.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Deaf children in yard of Aga Khan Deaf school
    0.06

    2.
    LV INTERIOR Teacher reading to class from black-board
    0.14

    3.
    SV Children wearing headphones and answering teacher (2 shots)
    0.32

    4.
    CU Older pupil with headphones reading blackboard
    0.43

    5.
    SV Boy reads from blackboard as class joins in
    0.56

    6.
    CU State school bus for deaf
    1.01

    7.
    CU PAN Young women sing during religious lesson speaking after teacher
    1.30

    8.
    SV Male teacher talking to small child with microphone and headphones and child repeating
    1.50

    9.
    CU Headmistress Mrs. Elizabeth Tetteh-Ocloo talking to reporter
    2.34

    10.
    SV Children march into school to beat of drum (2 shots)
    2.46

    11.
    CU Child wearing deaf aid
    2.53

    12.
    SV Teacher with child talking to class
    2.59

    13.
    CU Models of corn cob and fish
    3.04

    14.
    SV Girl picks up corn cob nameboard while teacher demonstrates to class
    3.24

    15.
    SCU Teacher and child using vibrations on throat method of sound (2 shots)3.39


    16.
    SV Children dancing to beat of drum and blowing of whistle
    3.50


    ELIZABETH TETTEH-OCLOO: "So many problems - but our main problem is lack of equipment. In the beginning I told you our method is total communication. We know it's Government policy that we use the oral method - but it's difficult because we don't have all the equipment. In a school for the deaf the children must have individual hearing aids. We have a total of 150 children with 10 hearing aids. These hearing aids are not in use because there are no batteries. We have only one speech trainer - no auditory trainers - no other equipment."



    KENYA: CHILDREN IN SCHOOL YARD OF AGA KHAN SCHOOL: TEACHER READING TO CLASS FROM BACKBOARD: CHILDREN WEARING HEADPHONES: BOY READING FROM BLACKBOARD.



    GHANA: SCHOOL BUS: CHILDREN SINGING: TEACHER TALKING TO SMALL CHILD WITH MICROPHONE AND HEADPHONES: HEADMISTRESS ELIZABETH TETTEH-OCLOO INTERVIEWED.



    SOUTH AFRICA: CHILDREN MARCHING: CHILD WITH DEAF AID: TEACHER WITH CLASS: MODELS OF CORN AND FISH: GIRL PICKS UP CORN NAMEBOARD AS TEACHER TALKS TO CLASS: TEACHER AND CHILDREN FEELING THROATS FOR VIBRATIONS: CHILDREN DANCING.



    Deaf children in Africa - and the Aga Khan school in Kenya is one with a special unit for them.



    It's a multi-racial school founded in nineteen sixty-two.



    The children's ages range from six to sixteen.



    This is the oral method they use in teaching the deaf.



    English is the language taught here and the school is fortunate to be so well equipped.



    But across the continent in Ghana, the Teshie State School for the Deaf works with little equipment.



    Although the language taught is English the children come from five different language groups.



    Mrs. Elizabeth Tetteh-Ocloo is the school's headmistress.



    Further south there is a school for black deaf children at Hammanskraal in South Africa.



    It's run by an order of Irish Dominican Roman Catholic nuns with assistance from the Department of Bantu Education.



    The main language is Setswana, the language of nearby Botswana.



    There are a hundred and fifty children at the school and they are taught by fifteen trained African teacher.




    Initials CL/1712 CL/1733


    This film includes an interview with Elizabeth Tetteh-Ocloo, the headmistress of the Deaf school in Ghana. The transcript follows:

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Deaf children need special training to enable them t o take an active and useful place in society - and many African countries recognise the need to provide the education these children need.

    Teaching deaf children to speak, read and write needs special kills and training. But most of all it needs love, patience and understanding - and the Africa teachers, both black and white, have an abundance of this to give their young charges.

    There is not a lot of difference in the teaching methods but the standard and quantity of equipment in each country varies.

    At the Aga Khan school in Kenya there is a special unit for deaf children. This multi-racial school was founded in 1962 and has two classrooms and two teachers. The children's ages range from six to 16 and t hey are integrated with normal primary classes.

    Outside normal classes they have speech training. Taught in English, the oral method - a method where they are encouraged to make as much use as possible of whatever hearing they have - is used.

    Across the continent in Ghana the Teshie State School for the Deaf has made tremendous steps since it was founded in 1966 - but it is still wrestling with many problems including the dire shortage of sophisticated equipment.

    Originally started by the Ghana Society for the Deaf and taken over by the government in 1969 its original aim was to train deaf children who had outgrown school age. It still does this as well as embracing children from kindergarten age.

    Although the main language taught is English, the children come from areas that use five different languages, creating an additional problem when they come to school. The school's headmistress, Elizabeth Tetteh-Ocloo, says because of lack of equipment the teachers have to use the "total communication" method to teach the children in preference to oral method preferred by the government. But with only 10 preference to the oral method preferred by the government. But with only 10 hearing aids to serve 150 children, one speech trainer and no auditory trainers the task is a mammoth one
    Moving south there is a modern school for black deaf children at Hammanskraal in South Africa. It was founded in 1962 and is run by an order of Irish Dominican Roman Catholic nuns with assistance from the Department of Bantu Education.

    The children go to the school as soon as their disability is diagnosed and stay there until they are about 16 or 17.

    They are taught in the Setswana language, the language of nearby Botswana.

    The 150 pupils live at the school and are taught by 15 trained African teachers. From the start they are taught speech and speech reading and later by oral communication, using microphones and head sets recently imported from the U.S.A.

    As they grow older they are taught a trade which will enable them to become gainfully employed when they leave the school. So thorough is this training that local factories are only too ready to snap up these young people when they are looking for jobs. Some of the girls who have left the school now own their own dressmaking salons and many of the boys are firmly established in the building trade in area.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA4TBL8JAUQGEDYTDZQT6OA0RVF
    Media URN:
    VLVA4TBL8JAUQGEDYTDZQT6OA0RVF
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    30/12/1975
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:03:51:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

Comments (0)

We always welcome comments and more information about our films.
All posts are reactively checked. Libellous and abusive comments are forbidden.

Add your comment