• Short Summary

    Speaking at the second press conference since becoming President, General de Gaulle announced in Paris, Nov. 10, that Soviet Premier Khrushchev would visit France from March 15, until the end of the month.

  • Description

    Speaking at the second press conference since becoming President, General de Gaulle announced in Paris, Nov. 10, that Soviet Premier Khrushchev would visit France from March 15, until the end of the month. He also called for a Western Summit at the beginning of spring, after the Khrushchev visit and before the East-West Summit, and spoke at length on Algerian affairs, repeating the cease-fire talks offer.

    He noted "some signs of relaxation of tension" due to Russia's more reserved approach to world affairs. As one reason for this apparent change, he named the Chinese situation, where Russia, "a white nation of Europe", found herself faced by the "yellow' multitude which is China, innumerable and miserable, indestructible and ambitious, a power which cannot be calculated, looking around her at the countries over which it would be necessary for her to spread out." He also pointed out that the Communists regime in Russia had, in its 42 years of existence, lost some of its virulence under the influence of the people's striving for a better life and freedom.

    Citing the examples of Munich, Teheran, Yalta, Potsdam, General de Gaulle emphasized the need to avoid hastiness in arranging an East-West Summit. After mentioning a few of the items likely to figure on the Summit agenda, including the arms race, the problem of underdeveloped countries, the German question and dangers in the Middle East, Africa and Asia, he listed three preconditions for a Summit:
    1) Continued improvement in international relations;
    2) Preparation by the Heads of Governments of the western Powers of an agenda and a common position;
    3) Personal contacts between Khrushchev, himself, Debre and the French Government.

    Following his prepared statement, General de Gaulle answered questions on;
    1) ALGERIA. The Algerians would have an "entirely free" choice of their own destinies, and would be able not only to vote but to discuss details of a referendum in which to vote. Reiterating his appeal to Algerian rebel leaders to come forward for cease-fire talks, the General revealed thought-provoking figures of the loses on both sides.

    2) THE FRENCH COMMUNITY. He described denying evolution to French territories and jettisoning them as a financial burden, as equally wrong conceptions of the French role, France was resolved to give aid as far as possible to any country which sought it.

    3) THE SAHARA BOMB TEST. The U.N. had ever condemned "the frightful cosmic menace" of Russian or Anglo-American nuclear power. The feeling now displayed at the idea of a "very offensive" French explosion in the deepest Sahara seemed to be "excessive and artificial" and could only be seen as an "arbitrary manoeuvre against my country". France in equipping herself with nuclear arms, was doing a service to the equilibrium of the world. Although there seemed to be for the moment a sort of balance between the two nuclear blocks who could say whether they might not get together to share out the world, whether the two rivals might not "crush the others", with western Europe being "smashed by Moscow and central Europe by Washington".

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA4R9C5GXOEY5I6CU8QH33BY0S8
    Media URN:
    VLVA4R9C5GXOEY5I6CU8QH33BY0S8
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    11/11/1959
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Black & White
    Duration:
    00:02:53:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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