• Short Summary

    JAKARTA AND CIBINONG, INDONESIA

    INTRODUCTION: University students in Indonesia are suffering from a serious handicap - a dire shortage of text books.

  • Description

    GV Indonesian University. 0.04
    GV INT Students in library with half-empty shelves. (3 SHOTS) 0.12
    SV PAN DOWN Old books on shelves. 0.21
    SV ZOOM IN Book printed in 1971. 0.27
    SVs Students and empty bookcase. (2 SHOTS) 0.33
    GVs Old-fashioned printing works. (5 SHOTS) 0.52
    GV Women assembling books. (2 SHOTS) 0.59
    SV ZOOM INTO CU Textbook covers. 1.05
    GV Second-hand books on sale in market. (3 SHOTS) 1.17
    GV People browsing through books. 1.20
    GV Photocopying shop with copies made. (2 SHOTS) 1.41

    InitialsJS
    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: JAKARTA AND CIBINONG, INDONESIA

    INTRODUCTION: University students in Indonesia are suffering from a serious handicap - a dire shortage of text books. They are having to struggle through their courses using inadequate libraries and out-of-date reading material.
    SYNOPSIS: Jakarta University is just one of 29 state and 21 private universities in Indonesia, which have around 170,000 students in all. But the empty spaces on the library shelves show the extent of the problem those students face. Many of the text books which are available are outdated, so students are unable to keep abreast of latest developments in their chosen studies.
    It is not only in university libraries that books are in short supply. Students cannot even buy the books they need for their studies. Antiquated printing presses are unable to produce enough books to meet the demand for academic texts in the Indonesian language, so bookshops too remain understocked at centres of learning.
    At present only 3,000 new titles per year are published in Indonesia, a low figure by international standards. Few of them are considered to be of much educational value.
    Students have to seek many of the books they need at second-hand book stalls. This is also the only way they can find enough books written in their own language. Of the few books available in the libraries, about three-quarters are in English, a language only 10 per cent of the students can read. So they have to improvise as best they can. By photocopying friend's books and buying in the second-hand market, Indonesia's students make the best use of the limited resources available.
    Source: REUTERS - WALTER BURGESS

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA4PGHIX00F005S4KN944OBWWXN
    Media URN:
    VLVA4PGHIX00F005S4KN944OBWWXN
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    03/07/1981
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:41:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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