• Short Summary

    A team of doctors in Melbourne, Australia, has successfully attempted a short-term teat tube pregnancy - probably for the first success of its kind ever.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Exterior Queen Victoria Hospital
    0.06

    2.
    SV Doctor experimenting in laboratory.
    0.29

    3.
    CU Picture of egg
    0.35

    4.
    SCU Dr. Mack Talbot speaking to reporter.
    1.30


    REPORTER: "Are you worried about criticism that you're dabbling in something which is an act of God...and not in the hands of the surgeons."



    DR. TALBOT: "As a physician, I feel, and the people I work with feel, we are only responding to a demand made by infertile women. These women have endeavoured by other means to obtain their own children, either by normal means or adoption. When these avenues close...the women continue to ask for other means of obtaining a pregnancy. The whole procedure would seem one more available avenue for such women, and as they are demanding this, we feel we should follow if up further."




    Initials AE/18.04 AE/18.12



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: A team of doctors in Melbourne, Australia, has successfully attempted a short-term teat tube pregnancy - probably for the first success of its kind ever. A 36-year-old woman was pregnant for nine says after planting a test tube fertilised embryo in her womb. A team of London doctors had previously fertilised an egg in a test tube, but no pregnancy was confirmed.

    Doctors at Melbourne's Queen Victoria Hospital will make another attempt at a test tube pregnancy in the next six weeks. Three women ... all aged about 30... are now undergoing preliminary testa at the hospital.

    One of the team said it could be a short time or many years before the procedure was perfected...that just could not be predicted. "The pregnancy wasn't very long," he added, "but at least it was a pregnancy."
    One of the team said it could be a short time or many years before the procedure was perfected...that just could not be predicted. "The pregnancy wasn't very long," he added, "but at least it was a pregnancy."
    However, other Australian doctors have rested the results with some scepticism. They want to know if there was any growth in the implanted egg to indicated pregnancy had occurred.

    The operation took place in mid-July, but the results were not announced until a news conference at the hospital on Thursday (30 August).

    A TRANSCRIPT OF COMMENTS BY DR. MACK TALBOT, A MEMBER OF THE TEAM, APPEARS BELOW.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA4KUF2XI38RH5GQ481ZPQRVVLQ
    Media URN:
    VLVA4KUF2XI38RH5GQ481ZPQRVVLQ
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    02/09/1973
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:29:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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