• Short Summary

    Denmark goes to the polls on Tuesday (21 September) to elect a new four-year Parliament expires next January, but Prime Minister Hilmar Baunsgaard called the election for this month to avoid interrupting the new parliamentary year, starting in October.

  • Description

    Denmark goes to the polls on Tuesday (21 September) to elect a new four-year Parliament expires next January, but Prime Minister Hilmar Baunsgaard called the election for this month to avoid interrupting the new parliamentary year, starting in October.

    Nine parties are between them contesting 179 seats in the Christians-borg Palace chamber. The four principal parties are the opposition Social Democrats, the largest single party with 62 seats, and the three forming the ruling right-centre coalition: Conservatives (37 seats), Liberals (34 seats) and Radicals (27 seats).

    The Social democrats, defeated in 1967, are reported to have a good chance of returning to power.

    The main issue is the present Government's handling of Denmark's balance of payments, on which the deficit has doubled since the coalition took office. Membership of the European Common Market is not an issue between the major parties, but is contested by several of the smaller groups.

    SYNOPSIS: The political temperature in Denmark has been rising this month since Prime Minister Hilmar Baunsgaard, leader of the ruling right-centre coalition, called a general election. The vote next Tuesday will decide who occupies these 179 seats for the next four years.

    The situation is quite a puzzle for Danish voters, since there are few major issues between the big parties. The "left party" but is in fact one of the three parties in the centre-right coalition which took over the government in the 1967 elections. The Liberals have announced that a vote for them is a vote for the European Common Market, and their Conservative and Radical coalition partners also support Denmark's entry into the European group.

    But the opposition Social Democrats, who are hoping to return to power, are also in favour of the Common Market, so it is left to the five smaller parties to make is an election issue. The main domestic issue is Denmark's balance of payments deficit, which has doubled under the coalition. And a new party has been formed to combat loose morals and Denmark's liberal attitude to pornography.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA4HKH5UG3N5S465MX3QQ9T2N8N
    Media URN:
    VLVA4HKH5UG3N5S465MX3QQ9T2N8N
    Group:
    Reuters - Incuding Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    18/07/1971
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:15:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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