• Short Summary

    Apollo 16 astronauts John Young and Charles Duke bumped and bounced their way over the Lunar Highlands on Saturday (April 22), spending a total of 7 hours 12 minutes in their second exploration of the Descartes region of the moon.

  • Description

    Apollo 16 astronauts John Young and Charles Duke bumped and bounced their way over the Lunar Highlands on Saturday (April 22), spending a total of 7 hours 12 minutes in their second exploration of the Descartes region of the moon.

    Diving their lunar rover, the two explorers scrambled around moon craters collecting rock and soil samples, and so established a new record--the first time men have spent more than seven hours on the airless lunar surface.

    The fast pace of their exploration left scientists back on earth brimming with excitement and admiration. Geologists at Houston Mission Control, like millions of television viewers, saw Young and Duke collect scores of rocks from the sides of a mountain, bore into the lunar crust for soil samples and pick up dust with long-handled scoops.

    Later, the two men returned to their moonship, Orion, for a long, deep sleep before emerging again for their third and last exploration.

    SYNOPSIS: The Apollo 16 astronauts were out again on the lunar surface Saturday for their second round of exploration. Gathering rock samples, they sometimes staggered and fell. But the lack of gravity made it easy for them to regain their balance. Charles Duke and John Young raced over the lunar landscape, picking up scores of rocks and soil samples which delighted scientists back on earth.

    So far, Duke and Young have proved to be the most enthusiastic and eager astronauts the United States has yet produced. The second day of exploration was packed with hard work and the excitement of fresh discoveries, including blue, green and white crystalline rocks which may help scientists determine the moon's age.

    The fast pace of the explorers' work combined with the rubble-strewn lunar crust often made the going rough. But through it all, Duke and Young maintained their high spirits. Their second moonwalk of seven hours, 12 minutes set a new endurance record. It was the first time men have spent more than seven hours on the harsh lunar surface. The two astronauts made good use of their lunar rover during the second exploration. They were scheduled to use it again on the third and final exploration before blasting off and rejoining the mother ship, Casper, circling the moon with the third man in the mission, astronaut Ken Mattingly.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA4H7GPMYFL89PLHSPYQBXXVBXH
    Media URN:
    VLVA4H7GPMYFL89PLHSPYQBXXVBXH
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    23/04/1972
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:36:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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