• Short Summary

    About 70 percent of Johannesburg's black workforce has responded to calls for a 3-day strike to protest against the South African government's apartheid policies.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Soweto and deserted streets. (3 shots)
    0.16

    2.
    SV African interviewed. With overlayed scenes of suburban trains and people wandering in streets and GVS of Soweto. (9 shots)
    1.09


    REPORTER: "How successful has the strike been today?"



    AFRICAN: "Well it has been a great success because most of the people have stayed away from work, and I think it was a very good idea for the people to do that.



    REPORTER: "Have there been any problems with transport at all?



    AFRICAN: "Most taxi people are not going to work. I mean they are not supporting the government and they are not transporting the people because they feel too. We are supported by the people and if they stand with the people they get the good support.



    REPORTER: "Was there any intimidation of the workers today?



    AFRICAN: "No, there wasn't any because I had asked -- In the afternoon I go out just to see if there is any trouble, so that I can run away if I can. But there wasn't any intimidation."



    South Africa's 2,250,000 coloureds - a fifth of them live in Cape Town -- have increasingly identified with black protest against the government's policy of apartheid. On the Cape Town docks about 80 percent of the black and coloured stevedores stayed away from work. In Soweto a railway spokesman said six commuter trains from the town were cancelled because there were not enough passengers, and a local bus company said it was carrying about two-thirds of its normal number of passengers.




    Initials VS 18.15



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: About 70 percent of Johannesburg's black workforce has responded to calls for a 3-day strike to protest against the South African government's apartheid policies. Thousands of coloured (mixed race) workers in Cape Town have also joined in the protest, which is affecting Cape Town's docks and building industry as well as bread and milk deliveries.

    SYNOPSIS: Normally about 350,000 blacks travel into Johannesburg from Soweto and Alexandra townships each day, but this has been cut by about two thirds since Monday (13 September). A Visnews reporter spoke to a black strike militant about the protest.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA4B10WFZB2ITLQ8V8FRG01Q9RT
    Media URN:
    VLVA4B10WFZB2ITLQ8V8FRG01Q9RT
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    15/09/1976
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:09:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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