• Short Summary

    Soviet women were given full legal equality with men soon after the 1917 revolution and today they make up about half of the work-force.

  • Description

    Soviet women were given full legal equality with men soon after the 1917 revolution and today they make up about half of the work-force.

    Women dominate some professions. Recent statistics show that women comprise 72 per cent of the Soviet Union's doctors and 71 per cent of its teachers. Nearly a third of all Soviet members of parliament are women.

    Woman's position in the Soviet Union could be a source of envy for womens liberation activists in Western countries.

    But there are drawbacks. While many women hold top professional jobs, the majority have to work in factories, on State farms or join the men in heavy labouring jobs.

    And Soviet women who work to maintain the family income and meet the State's need for increased production also have to find time to care for their children, do the housework, and queue for food and other household goods.

    The position of women is being discussed in Soviet newspapers. Some writers have called for greater participation by women in farm and factory management and more time off work to bring up children, rather than leave them in the care of grandparents or kindergartens. Others have stressed that women in the Soviet Union are luckier than elsewhere, as the Soviet system makes it possible for women to work and raise a family.

    SYNOPSIS: There are more than one hundred and thirty million women in the Soviet Union and they make up about half of the work force.

    In Moscow, women drive taxis and can be found in jobs ranging from top professional posts to menial tasks.

    Women were given legal equality with men soon after the 1917 Revolution.

    Their contribution to the Soviet economy is marked every year with a public holiday.

    While their status may be envied by women' liberation activists in the West, Soviet women must endure tedious queues for household goods. Many women shop on their way to work, in case supplies run out during the day.

    Working mothers have to leave their children with grandparents or in state-run kindergartens.

    The Cancer Research Institute in Moscow employs some of the three hundred and fifty thousand women scientific workers in the Soviet Union.

    There are more women doctors and teachers than men, but a frequent complaint is that only men reach the highest positions.

    The principle of equal pay for equal work is universal, but Soviet women tend to be more highly represented in the poorer paid and less attractive jobs.

    On the large state farms, women work in the fields, while men occupy most of the administrative jobs.

    Women are also to be fond doing heavy labouring work, like building roads, swinging a pick or shovel along with the men.

    The role of women in Soviet society is being increasingly questioned. Articles in newspapers have called for greater participation by women in farm and factory management. They've also said women should have incentives to leave their jobs and bring up their children, rather than leave them in the care of others. Other writers have pointed out that Soviet women are luckier than those elsewhere, as the system allows them to work and raise a family.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA48L3O526PS1W6EYPYNDUTS6NV
    Media URN:
    VLVA48L3O526PS1W6EYPYNDUTS6NV
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    26/09/1972
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:05:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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