• Short Summary

    The Soviet Union put on a modest display of armaments in Moscow on Tuesday (7 November) -- the sixty-first anniversary parade for the revolution.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Red Square in Moscow decorated for celebrations of revolution.
    0.03

    2.
    LV & CU President Leonid Brezhnev, Council of Ministers leader Alexei Kosygin and other politbureau members on Lenin mausoleum balcony. (2 SHOTS)
    0.16

    3.
    GV Crowd waving.
    0.19

    4.
    GV Leaders watching crowd.
    0.22

    5.
    TV Military march past.
    0.26

    6.
    GV Troops marching past mural of Lenin in background. (4 SHOTS)
    0.53

    7.
    TV & LV Marchpast and tanks and artillery pieces in parade. (6 SHOTS)
    1.20

    8.
    CU & ZOOM OUT TO SV Military personnel.
    1.23

    9.
    SV & TV Missile launchers paraded past with missiles. (2 SHOTS)
    1.33

    10.
    CU Tourists filming.
    1.34

    11.
    TV Red Square filled with flags and marchers.
    1.42

    12.
    SV & TV Crowds waving red flags. (2 SHOTS)
    1.50

    13.
    GV & ZOOM INTO SV Float followed by crowd carrying red paper flowers.
    2.02

    14.
    TV ZOOM OUT Red Square.
    2.16



    Initials JS/1830



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: The Soviet Union put on a modest display of armaments in Moscow on Tuesday (7 November) -- the sixty-first anniversary parade for the revolution. Instead, the belligerence was verbal, a sharp speech from Defence Minister Dmitry Ustinov, who accused China of threatening world peace.

    SYNOPSIS: As usual, Red Square was packed, and chilly. Taking the salute at Lenin's tomb in the square were President Leonid Brezhnev, the head of the Council of Ministers, Alexei Kosygin, and other Kremlin leaders. Among their guests was visiting Vietnamese communist party leader Le Duan.

    Observers said Mr. Brezhnev, whose health has been poor for some time, looked grey and tired. The troops on parade. Earlier, they had repeatedly burst into loud cheers when Mr. Ustinov denounced China as a threat to world peace and Socialism, and said the Soviet Union would continue to resist what he called "the aggressive attempts of imperialism and its helpers". The Chinese Charge d'Affaires and his delegation had walked out on the parade in response to his criticism.

    The parade contained now new items of military hardware. This contrasted to last year's massive sixtieth anniversary celebrations, which featured the formidable T-seven-two tanks, and strategic missiles. The two hundred vehicles included tracked personnel carriers, self-propelled howitzers, and short-range missiles, and missile launchers, all of which were old hat to observers.

    Some felt the authorities had left out heavy-tracked vehicles to avoid damaging the cobblestones of Red Square, which is one of many areas being renovated throughout Moscow for the 1980 Olympic Games.

    After the parade, the people had their turn. Tens of thousands marched past the saluting base with wheeled floats showing portraits of the Kremlin leaders, and they flapped a mobile forest of red paper flowers.

    The ritual show of military strength was over for another year, and the Soviet citizens packed together in the vast square to acknowledge generations of communism on this, their national day.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA485IQ7GTS4B02S8OCAKEU0OZJ
    Media URN:
    VLVA485IQ7GTS4B02S8OCAKEU0OZJ
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    08/11/1978
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:16:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

Comments (0)

We always welcome comments and more information about our films.
All posts are reactively checked. Libellous and abusive comments are forbidden.

Add your comment