• Short Summary

    Although English and Urdu are now the accepted standard languages of India, any attempt to wipe out the lesser tongues of the great continent is usually met with violent opposition.

  • Description

    Although English and Urdu are now the accepted standard languages of India, any attempt to wipe out the lesser tongues of the great continent is usually met with violent opposition.
    A recent flair-up in the Punjab town of Chandigarh followed the decision of the Punjab government to adopt Curmukhi as a compulsory subject for all school children, and to use the language in all government departments.
    Organised by the Arya Samaj sect, Hindus started a pro-Hindi agitation in Chandigarh and soon had the support of the Hindi Raksha Samiti and the Sanatanist sect.
    Finally, the demonstrations came under control of the Central Hindi Raksh Samiti in Delhi. Under the Indian constitution, Hindi has a place as a national language, but Gurmukhi - which was introduced by the Sikh Prophet Guru Nanak - is easier to teach and to use in the study of religion and Philosophy.
    In the days when the Hindu religion was in danger of being exterminated by the Moslems, Sikh Gurus, - were born Hindus - united as a sect and interviewed to Unite Moslems and Hindus.
    But the Sikhs remained a separate sect and religion which ultimately led to disagreements between Sikhas and Hindus.
    The result it that Hindus consider the compulsory Gurumukhi as a Sikh language and demand that Hindi should be the official tongue with the Sikh dialect regarded as a secondary tongue.
    At present, demonstrations are restricted to Chandigarh, the capital of the Punjab. This new town, which was designed by the French architect, is still being developed and its' present population - about 15,000 - consists mainly of government servants.
    The usual pattern of the demonstrations follows an accepted course. Hindus congregate outside the government building and try to break through the police cordon.
    Having failed to do this, they sit down in the roadway and refuse to move when ordered to do so by the police. One group of Sadhus are squatting permanently in from of the government building in protest against the new law.
    Although the police take little notice of the slogan shouting men and women, blocking the road is against the state law and the demonstrators are carried away by the police who finally release them some distance away.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA466ID01EEFYW72MWHDB1NKR0Q
    Media URN:
    VLVA466ID01EEFYW72MWHDB1NKR0Q
    Group:
    Reuters - Incuding Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    19/07/1957
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Black & White
    Duration:
    00:01:23:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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