• Short Summary

    In Jordan, more women are being encouraged to join the police force. Jordan was one?

  • Description

    1.
    SV & CU Women cadets slow and quick march to bagpipes at institute in Jordan (3 shots)
    0.23

    2.
    CU & SV Platoon watch as instructor demonstrators assembly of rifle (3 shots)
    0.51

    3.
    CU Cadet assembles rifle, stands up and takes aim
    1.04

    4.
    CU INTERIOR Targets at firing range
    1.07

    5.
    SV & CU Policeman firing pistol at targets (3 shots)
    1.23

    6.
    SV & CU Women practising unarmed combat (2 shots)
    1.49

    7.
    CU Pistol and dagger used in armed combat
    1.53

    8.
    SV Women showing disarming techniques
    2.03



    Initials BB/



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: In Jordan, more women are being encouraged to join the police force. Jordan was one of the first Arab countries to recruit policewomen, and there are now about 70 of them serving in the force throughout the country.

    SYNOPSIS: There are 12 women cadets attending this course at the Princess Basma Institute in Amman -- 10 of them Jordanian are two from Bahrain.

    They're expected to undergo the same tough training as men. The recruits include university graduates who may go on fill senior positions.

    Weapons training is an important part of the four-month course. When they graduate in July the women will be expected to carry guns on duty -- and use them if necessary. Jordan formed its first women's unit in 1972, becoming the fourth Arab country to do so after Tunisia, the Sudan and Bahrain. Since then Oman, Syria, Dubai and Abu Dhabi have followed suit.

    Women police receive instruction in both civil and Islamic law, since religion has an important role in Jordanian society. They also learn first aid for treating injured in an emergency -- and take part in target practice at a firing range.

    High standards of accuracy with a pistol are expected from the cadets -- some of whom are only 17 years old -- as well as high standards of fitness.

    Judo and karate are considered ideal ways to achieve fitness and teach the women self-defence. Cadets who join without finishing school can expect to start off in the lowest ranks when they complete the course. High school graduates become corporals and those with university degrees begin with the rank of lieutenant.

    Next month will see the graduation of the 10th group of women to be trained in Jordan -- an indication of their growing importance in the country's police force.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA45RZE9WBRW85FUAR171H9HWPU
    Media URN:
    VLVA45RZE9WBRW85FUAR171H9HWPU
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    19/06/1979
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:04:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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