• Short Summary

    TORONTO, CANADA

    Newly separated Siamese twin, Win Htut, is recovering slower than her brother Lin, after surgery on July 29 at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children, which changed her into a girl.

  • Description

    1. SVs Surgeons in operating room, preparing for surgery. (4 SHOTS) 0.27
    2. GRAPHIC Anatomical division of liver, pelvis and abdominals to be performed on twins; GRAPHIC of completed division. (2 SHOTS) 0.38
    3. SV Operating. (2 SHOTS) 1.03
    4. CU Dr. Geoffrey Barker, Intensive Care Unit speaking of recovery of twins. (SOT) 1.24
    5. CU Dr. Robert Filler, Chief Surgeon speaking on surgeon morale and genital reconstruction; still of twins before separation. (SOT)(3 SHOTS) 1.53
    TRANSCRIPT: BARKER: (SEQ 4) "...emerging from his sleeplike state and is now aware of his environment. He has communicated with the nurses he came over from Burma with. When because of the complication yesterday, we elected to continue with the heavy sedation, because of that, he is in a deep sleep."
    FILLER: (SEQ 5) "It was an exciting time for everyone and I was guess our epinephrine levels, our andrenalin levels were high enough to keep us pretty much awake. And we were really pleased with what we were able to do for these children. We constructed a vagina for Win and we removed the male gonads from Win so that they will not affect her any further in terms of masculisation."
    InitialsGG/GAYEST


    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: TORONTO, CANADA

    Newly separated Siamese twin, Win Htut, is recovering slower than her brother Lin, after surgery on July 29 at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children, which changed her into a girl. In the 17-hour surgery, doctors reconstructed the twins, joined from the diaphragm down, by cutting apart the pelvis, dividing joined livers and intestines and creating bladders and urethras. The two-and-a-half-year-old Burmese infants had shared one set of male genetalia until doctors, after consulting the twins' parents, decided to make the less aggressive Win a female, replacing male gonads with a constructed vagina. Less than 24 hours after the surgery, Win returned to the operating room for the repair of a broken blood vessel in her new abdominal wall. On July 31 Dr. Robert Filler, head of the operating team, and Dr. Geoffrey A. Barker, director of the Intensive Care Unit, assessed the children's condition as stable but critical. They said the next few days would be crucial for Win's recovery. Although this was Filler's third Siamese twin separation, it was the first time he had ever changed the gender of a twin. Siamese twins tend to be female. Both Htut children have male Y chromosomes and will undergo hormone treatments after their recovery. Win is not expected to be able to produced children. Doctors are optimistic about the twin's physical recovery, giving them a 95 per cent survival chance. But they admit psychological problems may lie ahead for the brother and sisters. Both twins are receiving blood transfusions, fluids and antibiotics intravenously and are expected to remain at the hospital for weeks.

    Source: CANADIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION (CBC)

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA40UXF3BEDO14MQLBDYSN4S337
    Media URN:
    VLVA40UXF3BEDO14MQLBDYSN4S337
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    31/07/1984
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:53:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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